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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Strip-Tillage in the Northern Us Corn Belt: Abiotic and Biotic Effects on Corn Growth and Yield

Authors
item Eash, Neal - UNIV. OF MINNESOTA
item Sauer, Thomas
item Potter, Bruce - UNIV. OF MINNESOTA

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Meetings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 14, 2002
Publication Date: November 14, 2002
Citation: EASH, N.S., SAUER, T.J., POTTER, B.D. STRIP-TILLAGE IN THE NORTHERN US CORN BELT: ABIOTIC AND BIOTIC EFFECTS ON CORN GROWTH AND YIELD. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRONOMY MEETINGS. 2002. ASA-CSSA-SSSA. CD-ROM. MADISON, WI.

Technical Abstract: Full width, deep tillage following corn or soybean harvest is common in the fall in southwest Minnesota. Reasons for fall tillage include warmer soil temperatures in the spring, easier planting, perceived decreases in disease and insect pressure, and timelinesss. Water and wind erosion losses are frequent and substantial where tillage minimizes crop residue cover. No-till is not viewed as an option due to cold soil temperatures during planting. Alternative management strategies are needed that provide residue cover but also promote warmer temperatures in the seed zone. Strip tillage may be a management strategy that provides bare soil in the intrarow while maintaining interrow residue cover. In plots with contrasting tillage treatments, we measured seed zone temperatures at the 5-cm depth in the intrarow and interrow positions. Soil heat flux, net radiation, and wind speed were also recorded. Results from this study indicate that strip tillage may be a viable option for producers because intrarow soil temperature values were similar under very contrasting tillage practices while maintaining adequate residue cover for erosion control.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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