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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Iron Bioavailability from Common Raisin-Containing Foods Assessed with An in Vitro Digestion/caco-2 Cell Culture Model: Effects of Raisins

Authors
item Yeung, C - CORNELL UNIVERSITY
item Glahn, Raymond
item Miller, D - CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2003
Publication Date: May 1, 2003
Citation: Yeung, C.K., Glahn, R.P., Miller, D.D. 2003. Iron bioavailability from common raisin-containing foods assessed with an in vitro digestion/caco-2 cell culture model: effects of raisins. Journal of Food Science. 68(5):1866-1870.

Interpretive Summary: The effects of raisins on iron bioavailability from wheat bran cereal, bread, rice pudding, and granola bars were studied. Iron bioavailability was assessed with a simulated digestion/cell culture model that mimics the digestion and uptake processes in the human gut. Raisins reduced iron bioavailability from all foods, except granola bars. Raisins also reduced iron bioavailability from samples of wheat bran cereal and bread fortified with elemental iron or ferrous sulfate, but this inhibitory effect was less pronounced in samples fortified with sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetate (NaFeEDTA). Iron bioavailability was markedly higher for samples fortified with NaFeEDTA, suggesting that iron in the form of NaFeEDTA is more bioavailable than elemental iron or ferrous sulfate in raisin-containing foods.

Technical Abstract: The effects of raisins on iron bioavailability from wheat bran cereal, bread, rice pudding, and granola bars were studied. Iron bioavailability was assessed with an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model. Raisins reduced iron bioavailability from all foods, except granola bars. Raisins also reduced iron bioavailability from samples of wheat bran cereal and bread fortified with elemental iron or ferrous sulfate, but this inhibitory effect was less pronounced in samples fortified with sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetate (NaFeEDTA). Iron bioavailability was markedly higher for samples fortified with NaFeEDTA, suggesting that iron in the form of NaFeEDTA is more bioavailable than elemental iron or ferrous sulfate in raisin-containing foods.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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