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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Transgenic Papaya: a Case for Managing Risks of Papaya Ringspot Virus in Hawaii

Authors
item Gonsalves, Dennis
item Ferreira, Stephen - UNIV OF HAWAII

Submitted to: Plant Health Progress
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 13, 2003
Publication Date: May 13, 2003
Citation: Gonsalves, D., Ferreira, S. 2003. Transgenic papaya: A case for managing risks of papaya ringspot virus in Hawaii. Plant Health Progress. doi:10.1094/PHP-2003-1113-03-RV.

Interpretive Summary: In May 1992, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV was detected in the Puna district of Hawaii Island, the main papaya growing region of the state of Hawaii. By 1994 Hawaii's papaya industry was facing devastating damage from PRSV. Efforts to develop resistant transgenic papaya were started in the mid 1980s and a resistant line was identified in 1991. Two cultivars were developed from this line and were commercialized in 1998. 'Rainbow', an F1 hybrid from a cross of the transgenic 'SunUp' and nontransgenic 'Kapoho', is now widely planted and has helped save the papaya industry. In addition, PRSV inocula in Puna were greatly reduced as abandoned infected fields were replanted with transgenic papaya. These conditions have allowed growers to continue the production of nontransgenic 'Kapoho' in Puna to keep the Japan market supplied, since the transgenic papaya is not yet deregulated in that country.

Technical Abstract: In May 1992, papaya ringspot virus (PRSV was detected in the Puna district of Hawaii Island, the main papaya growing region of the state of Hawaii. By 1994 Hawaii's papaya industry was facing devastating damage from PRSV. Efforts to develop resistant transgenic papaya were started in the mid 1980s and a resistant line was identified in 1991. Two cultivars were developed from this line and were commercialized in 1998. 'Rainbow', an F1 hybrid from a cross of the transgenic 'SunUp' and nontransgenic 'Kapoho', is now widely planted and has helped save the papaya industry. In addition, PRSV inocula in Puna were greatly reduced as abandoned infected fields were replanted with transgenic papaya. These conditions have allowed growers to continue the production of nontransgenic 'Kapoho' in Puna to keep the Japan market supplied, since the transgenic papaya is not yet deregulated in that country.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014