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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetic Relationships among Annual and Perennial Wild Species of Cicer Using Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (Issr) Polymorphism

Authors
item Rajesh, P - NATIONAL CHEM LABORATORY
item Sant, V - NATIONAL CHEM LABORATORY
item Gupta, V - NATIONAL CHEM LABORATORY
item Muehlbauer, Frederick
item Ranjekar, P - NATIONAL CHEM LABORATORY

Submitted to: Journal of Euphytica
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 31, 2002
Publication Date: January 1, 2003
Citation: RAJESH,P.N., SANT,V.J., GUPTA,V.S., MUEHLBAUER,F.J., RANJEKAR,P.K., GENETIC RELATIONSHIPS AMONG ANNUAL AND PERENNIAL WILD SPECIES OF CICER USING INTER SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEAT (ISSR) POLYMORPHISM, JOURNAL OF EUPHYTICA, 2003. v. 129. p. 15-23.

Interpretive Summary: Chickpea breeding is hampered by a lack of genetic diversity in the cultivated species. To broaden the genetic base for breeding and crop improvement in this crop, geneticists and breeders have looked to related wild species for additional genes. The wild species of chickpea can be grouped into annual and perennial forms. In this research we analyzed the genetic similarity of the species to determine their relatedness and also their potential value for use in hybridization programs to improve the cultivated species. The results indicated the wild species most closely related to cultivated chickpea and also the degree of commonality among the genes within those species. The results are of value in chickpea breeding programs that utilize wild species germplasm. Expected results of those programs are the use of genes from the wild chickpea species for development of improved chickpea cultivars for disease resistance and quality traits.

Technical Abstract: Wild Cicer germplasm is known to have genes for disease resistance, stress tolerance and other important traits, and hence could be exploited for improving cultivated genotypes. However, only few Cicer species are interfertile and it is essential to overcome crossability barriers to utilize the germplasm more effectively. Genetic diversity analysis of Cicer species can give important clues in understanding species relationships and may assist in developing and planning breeding strategies. We selected 6 annual and 7 perennial wild species, which were amplified using 15ISSR primers and UPGMA and AMOVA were used to evaluate the genetic diversity. On an average, 6.6 polymorphic bands per primer were observed. Cluster analysis using the UPGMA algorithm indicated three major groups of species at the similarity value of 0.60 with many subclusters. The clustering pattern was in agreement with the data based on crossability, seed storage protein, isozyme, allozyme and RAPD marker analysis. The among-population component of annual and perennial groups calculated using AMOVA accounted for 39.00%. Our results suggested that wild annuals of Cicer were not monophyletic in nature.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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