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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Aerosol Exposure of White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus Virginianus) to Mycobacterium Bovis

Authors
item PALMER, MITCHELL
item WATERS, WADE
item WHIPPLE, DIANA

Submitted to: Journal of Wildlife Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 17, 2003
Publication Date: October 1, 2003
Citation: Palmer, M.V., Waters, W.R., Whipple, D.L. 2003. Aerosol exposure of white-tailed deer (odocoileus virginianus) to mycobacterium bovis. Journal of Wildlife Diseases. 39:817-823.

Interpretive Summary: Tuberculosis due to the bacterium Mycobacterium bovis affects both captive and free-ranging Cervidae in the United States. The presence of tuberculosis in wildlife poses serious challenges to the eradication of M. bovis from the United States. Various animal models have been developed to study tuberculosis of both humans and animals. Generally, tuberculosis is transmitted by aerosol and oral routes. Models of aerosol exposure of large animals to M. bovis are uncommon. In order to develop a reliable method of aerosol exposure of white-tailed deer to M. bovis, twelve, healthy, white-tailed deer, aged 8-10 months, were infected by aerosol exposure to high or low doses of M. bovis. Disease was more severe and more widely disseminated in deer receiving the high dose, while disease in deer receiving the low dose was more focused on the lungs and associated lymph nodes. Aerosol delivery of M. bovis to white-tailed deer results in lesions similar in distribution and character to those seen in naturally infected deer. This method of delivery can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis, immune reponse or vaccine efficacy.

Technical Abstract: Tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis affects both captive and free-ranging Cervidae in the United States. Various animal models have been developed to study tuberculosis of both humans and animals. Generally, tuberculosis is transmitted by aerosol and oral routes. Models of aerosol exposure of large animals to M. bovis are uncommon. In order to develop a reliable method of aerosol exposure of white-tailed deer to M. bovis, twelve, healthy, white-tailed deer, aged 8-10 months, were infected by aerosol exposure to 2x10**5 to 1x 10**6 CFU (high dose, n=4) of M. bovis or 6x10*2 to 1.6x10**3 CFU (low dose, n=8) of M. bovis. Tuberculous lesions were more widely disseminated in deer receiving the high dose, while lesions in deer receiving the low dose were more focused on the lungs and associated lymph nodes (tracheobronchial and mediastinal). Aerosol delivery of M. bovis to white-tailed deer results in lesions similar in distribution and character to those seen in naturally infected deer. This method of delivery can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis, immune reponse or vaccine efficacy.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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