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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: SYSTEMIC INDUCTION OF PHYTOALEXINS IN CUCUMBER IN RESPONSE TO TREATMENTS WITH FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS

Authors
item Ongena, M - CWBI - BELGIUM
item Daayf, F - AGRI. & AGRI-FOOD CANADA
item Thonart, P - UNIVERSITE LAVAL
item Benhamou, N - UNIVERSITE LAVAL
item PAULITZ, TIMOTHY
item Belanger, R - MCGILL UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Plant Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 20, 2002
Publication Date: August 20, 2002
Citation: ONGENA, M., DAAYF, F., THONART, P., BENHAMOU, N., PAULITZ, T.C., BELANGER, R.R. SYSTEMIC INDUCTION OF PHYTOALEXINS IN CUCUMBER IN RESPONSE TO TREATMENTS WITH FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS. PLANT PATHOLOGY. 49: 523-530 Aug.2002.

Interpretive Summary: The Pseudomonas putida isolate BTP1, a biocontrol agent, protects cucumber against Pythium aphanidermatum root rot. Recent work has shown that mutants that do not produce siderophores also protect against this disease. In this work, we showed that antifungal compounds or phytoalexins are produced in the root, and these aglycones are different than the compounds produced in the root.

Technical Abstract: The Pseudomonas putida isolate BTP1 and its sid mutant M3 were recently reported to protect cucumber against Pythium aphanidermatum root rot. This protection was mainly associated with an accumulation of antifungal phenolics in hte treated roots. In this study, analyses of root extracts from split-root experiments showed that these phytoalexins were produced systemically. Indeed, several antifungal molecules accumulated similarly in both treated and nontreated root parts of plants protected against P. aphanidermatum with BTP1 or M3. In addition, analyses of leaf samples also revealed increased amounts of fungitoxic molecules in PGPR-treated plants, although the nature of these molecules appeared to be different from those detected in roots. The antifungal compounds isolated both from roots and leaves were mainly detected in acid-hydrolyzed extracts containing aglycones. These results suggest that PGPR can elicit phytoalexins systemically in cucumber and that the overall defence response is not based on a single phytoalexin but is chemically complex and organ-specific.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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