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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Prevalence of Ergot of Sorghum in India

Authors
item Navi, S - IOWA STATE UNIV.
item Bandyopadyay, R - IITA, NIGERIA
item Tonapi, V - ICRISAT, PATANCHERU INDIA
item Nageshwar Rao, T - NRCS, ANDHRA, INDIA
item Tooley, Paul
item Reddy, R - ICRISAT, PATANCHERU INDIA
item Indira, S - NRCS, ANDHRA, INDIA
item Pande, S - ICRISAT, PATANCHERU INDIA

Submitted to: International Sorghum and Millets Newsletter
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 10, 2002
Publication Date: October 1, 2002
Citation: NAVI, S.S., BANDYOPADYAY, R., TONAPI, V.A., NAGESHWAR RAO, T.G., TOOLEY, P.W., REDDY, R.K., INDIRA, S., PANDE, S. PREVALENCE OF ERGOT OF SORGHUM IN INDIA. INTERNATIONAL SORGHUM AND MILLETS NEWSLETTER. 43:70-71. 2002.

Interpretive Summary: Ergot disease of sorghum is caused by the fungus Claviceps africana. The disease results in reduced grain yield, and problems in harvesting and processing sorghum grain due to the presence of a sticky substance called honeydew given off by infected plants. High incidences and severity of sorghum ergot can cause up to 100% yield losses in heavily affected areas. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 surveys of farmers'fields in seven states within India were performed, looking for sorghum ergot disease. The disease was observed to occur over a large area, with disease found in 213 fields out of 1255 fields surveyed. The severity of the disease varied in different fields, from trace amounts of disease to 100% disease severity in some fields. Grain losses exceeded 70% in some fields.

Technical Abstract: On-farm sorghum ergot surveys were conducted in India in 1999, 2000 and 2001. A seven state area was surveyed including 250 fields in Andhra Pradesh, 451 fields in Karnataka, 413 fields in Maharashtra, 127 fields in Tamil Nadu, 3 in Rajasthan, 10 in Uttar Pradesh, and 1 in Gujarat. Ergot incidence ranged from trace amounts (less than 1% ergot) to 61% and ergot severity ranged from trace amounts to 100% severity over the sampled regions. Losses of harvested grain exceeded 70% in some regions sustaining severe epidemics.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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