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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Establishment and Seedling Growth of Big Bluestem and Switchgrass Populations Divergently Selected for Seedling Tiller Number.

Authors
item Smart, A - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNI
item Vogel, Kenneth
item Moser, Lowell - UNI OF NE

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 3, 2003
Publication Date: July 1, 2003
Citation: SMART, A.J., VOGEL, K.P., MOSER, L.E. ESTABLISHMENT AND SEEDLING GROWTH OF BIG BLUESTEM AND SWITCHGRASS POPULATIONS DIVERGENTLY SELECTED FOR SEEDLING TILLER NUMBER. CROP SCIENCE. 2003.43:1434-1440.

Interpretive Summary: Native grasses such as big bluestem and switchgrass do not establish as easily as some introduced grasses such as smooth bromegrass. Previous research demonstrated that it was possible to develop switchgrass and big bluestem populations with increased seedling tiller weight or tiller numbers by breeding. Big bluestem and switchgrass populations that were developed by divergent selection for seedling tiller weight or seedling tiller number were evaluated for their ability to become established in production fields in comparison to the base or unselected populations. Selection for increased seedling above ground weight or tiller number till not improve establishment as measured stand counts. Establishment was not improved because seedling root characteristics were not modified by breeding. Breeding warm-season grasses for increased seedling vigor and establishment should focus on direst selection for root traits.

Technical Abstract: Selection at the seedling stage in grass breeding would be extremely useful if seedling traits are correlated to desired agronomic traits. The objective of this study was to evaluate seedling morphological development, plant growth, and field establishment of big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii Vitman) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) populations that were developed by divergent selection for seedling tiller number while selecting for high shoot weight. Six populations were evaluated: (i) `Pawnee¿ big bluestem base, (ii) `Pathfinder¿ switchgrass base, (iii) big bluestem, multiple tiller, (iv) big bluestem, single tiller, (v) switchgrass, multiple tiller, and (vi) switchgrass, single tiller. Field plots were seeded in spring 1999 and 2000 in a Kennebec silt loam (fine-silty, mixed, superactive, mesic Cumulic Hapludolls). Plants were excavated and evaluated during the growing season for shoot weight, root weight, and morphological stage of shoot and root systems. There were no major population differences in shoot weight, root weight, and morphological root stage. Shoot stage was higher for multiple tiller populations than single tiller populations 6 wk after emergence. Stand counts for all populations exceeded 10 seedlings per linear m of row, which is considered an acceptable stand density, and there were no consistent differences among populations. Populations divergently selected for seedling tiller number did not differ in ability to become established under field conditions because root systems apparently were not altered by the selection for seedling tiller number and weight. These results suggest that selection for high shoot weight did not improve seedling vigor in the field.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014