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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Description of Hespellia Stercorisuis Gen. Nov. Sp. Nov. and Hespellia Porcinus Sp. Nov. Isolated from Manure Storage Pits

Authors
item Whitehead, Terence
item Cotta, Michael
item Collins, Matthew - UNIV READING
item Lawson, Paul - UNIV READING

Submitted to: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 28, 2003
Publication Date: January 31, 2004
Citation: WHITEHEAD, T.R., COTTA, M.A., COLLINS, M.D., LAWSON, P.A. HESPELLIA STERCORISUIS GEN. NOV., SP. NOV. AND HESPELLIA PORCINUS SP. NOV., ISOLATED FROM SWINE MANURE STORAGE PITS. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SYSTEMATIC AND EVOLUTIONARY MICROBIOLOGY. 2004. V. 54. P. 241-245.

Interpretive Summary: Odor emanating from anaerobic lagoons and swine production facilities has increased the tension among rural neighbors and among urban and rural residents. Storage of swine waste is associated with the production of a variety of odorous compounds, including ammonia, volatile organic acids and alcohols, and sulfides. In order to reduce production of odorous compounds, the responsible bacteria present in the fecal matter and manure storage pits must first be identified. We now report on the identification and scientific naming of a new genus and two new species of anaerobic bacteria. The new genus is Hespellia, named after Robert B. Hespell, a former ARS microbiologist, for his many contributions to anaerobic microbiology. Such identification is crucial for devising strategies to deal with the problem of odor produced from stored animal manure.

Technical Abstract: Four Gram-positive staining, strictly anaerobic, non-spore-forming rod-shaped organisms were isolated from a pig manure storage pit. Comparative 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis revealed the isolated belonged to two related, but nevertheless distinct, groups. Sequence analysis showed the two groups of isolates were highly related to each other (approximately 97% 16S rDNA similarity), forming a distinct cluster within the Clostridium coccoides supra-generic rDNA grouping. Biochemical and physiological studies confirmed the division of the isolates into two related, albeit distinct, groups. Based on both phenotypic and phylogenetic evidence, we propose that the unidentified rod-shaped isolates from pig manure be classified in a new genus Hespellia, as Hespellia stercorisuis sp. nov. and Hespellia porcinus sp. nov. The type species is Hespellia stercorisuis PC18**T (=NRRL B-23456**T = CCUG 46279**T = ATCC BAA-677**T) and the type strain of Hespellia porcinus is PC80**T (=NRRL B-23458**T = ATCC BAA-674**T).

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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