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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Cysteamine on Growth Hormone, Weight Gain, Feed Consumption, and Body Composition of Turkeys

Authors
item Maruyama, Kimiaki
item Solomon, Morse
item Proudman, John

Submitted to: Meiji Univeristy Agriculture Research Bulletin
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 14, 2002
Publication Date: June 13, 2002
Citation: MARUYAMA, K., SOLOMON, M.B., PROUDMAN, J.A. EFFECTS OF CYSTEAMINE ON GROWTH HORMONE, WEIGHT GAIN, FEED CONSUMPTION, AND BODY COMPOSITION OF TURKEYS. Meiji Univeristy Agriculture Research Bulletin. 2002. v. 131. p. 37-46.

Interpretive Summary: The effect of a thiol agent cysteamine (mercaptoethylamine) administration on growth and body composition in growing turkeys was investigated. Cysteamine has been shown to inhibit somatostatin release which in turn inhibits the release of growth hormone. Therefore the administration of cysteamine may increase growth hormone secretions which may stimulate growth and improve feed efficiency. Cysteamine included in the diet at a level of 2400 ppm and fed ad libitum to growing turkeys resulted in significant reductions in carcass fat deposition. These results suggest that cysteamine, which has been demonstrated to influence the release of somatostatin, had a nutrient repartitioning effect which ultimately led to decreased carcass fat accretion.

Technical Abstract: Effects of cysteamine, an inhibitor of somatostatin secretion, on plasma growth hormone concentrations, growth and body composition of male Large White hybrid turkeys were investigated. To determine the effect of cysteamine on growth hormone secretion, turkeys were given cysteamine-HC1 at the dose of 300 mg/kg body weight through a stomach tube into the crop. No changes in plasma growth hormone concentrations were observed during the following 24-hour period. To determine the effect of dietary cysteamine on turkey growth and carcass composition, cysteamine-HC1 was added to the stock diet at the levels of 0, 0.12, and 0.24 percent at 8 weeks of age. Body weights and feed consumption were determined weekly from 8 to 16 weeks of age. Plasma growth hormone concentrations were measured at 8, 12, and 16 weeks. At 16 weeks of age, turkeys were killed to determine the chemical composition of the whole-body, and breast, thigh, and drumstick parts. Dietary cysteamine increased (P<0.05) plasma growth hormone concentrations at 16 weeks of age and decreased (P<0.05) feed consumption throughout the experiment. When turkeys were fed cysteamine, body fat was reduced (P<0.05), body moisture was increased (P<0.05), and body protein was unchanged. The chemical composition of breast, thigh and drumstick parts was not affected.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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