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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Nutrition Knowledge, Attitudes, and Cereal Consumption Practices among African American Children and Adolescents

Authors
item Williams, Jovan
item Johnson, Glenda - SOUTHERN UNIV AND A&M COL
item Mcgee, Bernestine - SOUTHERN UNIV AND A&M COL
item Bogle, Margaret

Submitted to: The 1890 Association of Research Directors Biennial Research Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 2003
Publication Date: March 1, 2003
Citation: EUGENE, J.C., JOHNSON, G.S., MCGEE, B.B., BOGLE, M.L. NUTRITION KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDES, AND CEREAL CONSUMPTION PRACTICES AMONG AFRICAN AMERICAN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS. THE 1890 ASSOCIATION OF RESEARCH DIRECTORS BIENNIAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM. Atlanta, Georgia. 2003. p. 155-156.

Technical Abstract: BACKGROUND: National data report that the amount of dietary fiber consumed by children and adolescents fail to meet current recommendations, and may be inadequate for health promotion and disease prevention. Many African American children and adolescents lack nutrition knowledge regarding fiber that would enable them to make good food choices, especially at breakfast. DESIGN: Non-experimental, descriptive cross-sectional survey, guided by the Health Belief Model. Data are based on responses to a 10-item, self-administered questionnaire. The main outcomes measured were demographics, dietary fiber-health attitudes, knowledge of fiber contained in foods, breakfast consumption habits, and frequently consumed ready-to-eat cereals. SUBJECTS/SETTINGS: Respondents were 238 African American students, 8-18 years of age, attending a summer enrichment program at a Louisiana university. STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFOROMED: Descriptive statistics analyses were conducted. RESULTS: Both males and females were unaware of the positive relationship between dietary fiber and health. Only 63 (26.5%) students indicated that fiber helps to prevent constipation, and 99 (41.6%) students indicated fiber prevents some types of cancer. From a list of popular children's foods, 22 % (53) of the students correctly identified bran flakes as the food with the highest content of fiber. Ninety percent (215) consumed breakfast daily; generally eating ready-to-eat cereals with milk, three to four times a week. Only 31 students (13%) reported frequently consuming fiber-rich ready-to-eat cereals. APPLICATION: Nutrition and health professionals need to develop innovative strategies for increasing the selection of fiber-rich foods by children and adolescents that will promote their present and ultimately, future nutrition health.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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