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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Post-Harvest Storage Traits.

Author
item Campbell, Larry

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2003
Publication Date: February 1, 2005
Citation: Campbell, L.G. 2005. Post-harvest storage traits. In: Biancardi, E., Campbell, L.G., Skaracis, G.N., and De Biaggi, M. Genetics and Breeding of Sugar Beet. Enfield, New Hampshire, Science Publishers, Inc. p. 122-126.

Interpretive Summary: After harvest, most of the sugarbeet crop is stored in large exposed piles for up to 200 days awaiting processing. During this time respiration, rot, accumulation of compounds that interfere with sugar extraction, and physical deterioration decrease the amount of sugar processors are able to extract from the stored roots. Differences in storage respiration rates have been documented and there appears to be ample genetic diversity to develop hybrids with relative low respiration rates, and hence less sugar loss. Breeders have been successful in selecting breeding lines that are resistant to the prevailing storage rot fungi. It appears the use of genetic resistance would provide protection similar to that obtained with the application of a fungicide. Methods for measuring respiration rate and resistance to the rot fungi are presented. It is concluded that developing commercial hybrids with low respiration rates and resistance to prevalent storage rot fungi would not present any unusual problems for commercial sugarbeet breeders.

Technical Abstract: After harvest, most of the sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) crop is stored in exposed piles for up to 200 days awaiting processing. During this time respiration, rot, accumulation of impurities, and physical deterioration decrease extractable sucrose. Differences in storage respiration rates have been documented and there appears to be ample genetic diversity for development of hybrids with relative low respiration rates. Breeders have been successful in selecting breeding lines that are resistant to the prevailing storage rot fungi (Phoma beteae Frank, Botrytis cinerea Pers. Ex Fr., and Penicillium claviforme Brainier). It appears the use of genetic resistance would provide protection similar to that obtained with the application of a fungicide. Methods for measuring respiration rate and resistance to the rot fungi that would be useful in a breeding program are presented. It is concluded that developing commercial hybrids with low respiration rates and resistance to prevalent storage rot fungi would not present any unusual problems for commercial sugarbeet breeders.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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