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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Vascular Lesions of a Cow and Bison with Sheep-Associated Malignant Catarrhal Fever Contain Ovine Herpesvirus 2-Infected Cd8+ T Lymphocytes

Authors
item Simon, S. - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV.
item Li, Hong
item O'Toole, D. - UNIV. OF WYOMING
item Crawford, T. - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV.
item Oaks, J. - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV.

Submitted to: Journal of General Virology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 3, 2003
Publication Date: August 1, 2003
Citation: Simon, S., Li, H., O'Toole, D., Crawford, T.B., Oaks, L. The vascular lesions of a cow and bison with sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever contain ovine herpesvirus 2-infected CD8+ T lymphocytes. Journal of General Virology. 2003. v. 84. p. 2009-2013.

Interpretive Summary: Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a serious herpesviral disease syndrome of certain ruminant species. There is little understanding of interaction between the virus and the host. Previous attempts to detect viral antigen or nucleic acids in lesions have been unsuccessful. In this study, the vascular lesions in the brains of a cow and a bison with acute MCF were evaluated by in situ PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrate that the predominant infiltrating cell type in these lesions was CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and that large numbers of these cells were infected with ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2). The lesions also contained macrophages, but no detectable CD4+ or B-lymphocytes. These results support the possibility that the pathogenesis of MCF is primarily related to direct virus-cell interactions or perhaps immune-mediated responses directed against infected cells.

Technical Abstract: Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a serious herpesviral disease syndrome of certain ruminant species. The microscopic pathology of MCF is characterized by lymphoid proliferation and infiltration, necrotizing vasculitis, and necrosis of lymphoid and epithelial tissues. Previous attempts to detect viral antigen or nucleic acids in lesions have been unsuccessful. Because of the apparent absence of virus, the pathogenesis of the lesions in acute MCF have been speculated to involve mechanisms of autoimmunity and lymphocyte dysregulation. In this study, the vascular lesions in the brains of a cow and a bison with acute MCF were evaluated by in situ PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrate that the predominant infiltrating cell type in these lesions were CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and that large numbers of these cells were infected with ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2). The lesions also contained macrophages, but no detectable CD4+ or B-lymphocytes.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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