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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Fire and Mowing on Expansion of Reestablished Black-Tailed Prairie Dog Colonies in Chihuahuan Desert Grasslands

Authors
item Ford, Paulette - ROCKY MT RESEARCH STATION
item Andersen, Mark - NEW MEXICO STATE UNIV
item Frederickson, Eddie
item Truett, Joe - TURNER ENDG SPECIES FUND
item Roemer, Gary - NEW MEXICO STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 2, 2002
Publication Date: December 2, 2002
Citation: FORD, P.L., ANDERSEN, M.C., FREDRICKSON, E.L., TRUETT, J., ROEMER, G.W. EFFECTS OF FIRE AND MOWING ON EXPANSION OF REESTABLISHED BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOG COLONIES IN CHIHUAHUAN DESERT GRASSLANDS. FIRE CONFERENCE PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS. 2002. ABSTRACT P. 49.

Technical Abstract: Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) currently occupy less than 2% of their historical range. This decline is due to eradication programs, habitat loss, and introduced pathogens. Active conservation measures for this species, including reintroduction, are underway in a number of areas. Prairie dogs are a key species in grassland ecosystems because of their effects on landscape pattern and ecosystem process. As part of a larger study of reciprocal effects of landscape and ecosystem factors on establishment and growth of prairie dog colonies, we investigated the effects of fire and mowing on numerical growth and aerial expansion of colonies reintroduced into the northern Chihuahuan Desert. On each of three colonies, established in 1998-1999 and ranging from 1.27 to 8 ha, we established six 50x50m experimental plots randomly assigned to burn or mowing treatments. The response variable was the number of new burrows appearing in each experimental plot. Results show no significant differences in the number of new burrows in burned vs. mowed plots; therefore, fire and mowing can be used interchangeably as management tools to reintroduce prairie dogs.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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