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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of sucrose octanoate on survival of nymph and adult Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Homoptera: Psyllidae)

Authors
item McKenzie, Cindy
item Puterka, Gary

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2003
Publication Date: June 1, 2004
Citation: McKenzie, C.L., Puterka, G.J. 2004. Effect of sucrose octanaote on survival of nymph and adult Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Homoptera: Psyllidae). Journal of Economic Entomology. 97(3):970-975.

Interpretive Summary: Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Homoptera: Psyllidae), was detected for the first time in the U.S. near Delray Beach, Florida on June 2, 1998 and is continuing to spread and multiply throughout southern Florida. AsCP is the vector of Liberobacter asiaticum; a phloem-limited bacterium that causes citrus greening disease (CGD). This pathogen has not been found in the Western Hemisphere to date. However, AsCP is a serious threat to the Florida citrus industry if CDG becomes introduced or should AsCP be found to vector other diseases of citrus. Further, high infestation levels of AsCP could impact citrus plant health, fruit quality or yield. Replicated laboratory and spray booth bioassays were conducted to determine the insecticidal activity of a synthetic analogue of natural sugar esters found in leaf trichomes of wild tobacco, Nicotiana gossei Domin, to nymph and adult AsCP. Field trials were initiated in Fort Pierce, Florida in 2000 to determine activity of this natural plant compound on AsCP and other citrus pests including immature Asian citrus leafminer (CLM). Sugar ester rates tested ranged from 400 to 8,000 ppm (.1 to 2% formulated product). Our data suggest that both AsCP nymphs and adults would be equally controlled to levels of >90% at the higher concentrations of sugar ester.

Technical Abstract: Replicated laboratory and spray booth bioassays were conducted to determine the insecticidal activity of a synthetic analogue of natural sugar esters found in leaf trichomes of wild tobacco, Nicotiana gossei Domin, to nymph and adult Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP). Sucrose octanoate was extremely toxic to small immature AsCP compared to large immature and adult AsCP using a petri dish bioassay device. Small nymph LC90 values were identical to large nymph LC50 values (920 ppm). When comparing LC90 values, large nymphs were 2.1-fold more tolerant than small nymphs and adult psyllids were 6.6-fold and 3.1-fold more tolerant to sucrose octanoate than small and large nymphs, respectively. Toxicity of sucrose octanoate when applied with a spray booth was not significantly different for small and large AsCP nymphs and mortality ranged from 51 to 100% and 30 to 96% for small and large nymphs, respectively, tested with a 400 to 8,000 ppm (.1 to 2% formulated product) dose response range. Field trials were initiated in Fort Pierce, Florida in 2000 to determine activity of this natural plant compound on AsCP and other citrus pests including immature Asian citrus leafminer (CLM). Our data suggest that both AsCP nymphs and adults would be equally controlled to levels of >90% at the higher concentrations (1-2% formulated product) of sugar ester and that coverage is crucial for achieving good control.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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