Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Vitamin K Content of Nuts and Fruits in the Us Diet

Authors
item Dismore, Mackenzie - HNRCA
item Haytowitz, David
item Gebhardt, Susan
item Peterson, James - HNRCA
item Booth, Sarah - HNRCA

Submitted to: Journal Of The American Dietetic Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2003
Publication Date: December 1, 2003
Citation: DISMORE, M.L., HAYTOWITZ, D.B., GEBHARDT, S.E., PETERSON, J.W., BOOTH, S.L. VITAMIN K CONTENT OF NUTS AND FRUITS IN THE US DIET. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION. 2003;103:1650-52.

Interpretive Summary: Fruit and nut samples obtained from the USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory as part of the National Food and Nutrient and Analysis Program, were analyzed for vitamin K. These samples were obtained from 12 locations collected at two different times. The vitamin K content of nuts ranged from 0 to 74 micrograms per 100 grams of nuts. Only cashews and pine nuts contain more than 15 micrograms of vitamin K per 100 grams of nuts. Of the fruits analyzed, the mean vitamin K content of prunes, kiwifruit, avocado, certain berries, grapes and figs ranged from 16 to 60 micrograms/100 grams of fruit. All other fruits analyzed contained less than 10 micrograms of phylloquinone per 100 grams of fruit. There were no systematic regional or seasonal differences in the phylloquinone content found in nuts or fruits. In conclusion, most nuts and fruits are not important dietary sources of vitamin K. The data from this study will assist dietitians in counseling patients using the oral anticoagulant, warfarin, so patients can consume a healthy diet including fruits and nuts, without compromising the stability of their oral anticoagulation therapy.

Technical Abstract: Fruit and nut samples obtained from the USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory as part of the National Food and Nutrient and Analysis Program, were analyzed for phylloquinone (Vitamin K-1) by high-performance liquid chromatography. These samples were obtained from 12 locations collected at two different times. The phylloquinone content of nuts ranged from below the limit of detection to 73.7 micrograms per 100 grams of nuts. Only cashews and pine nuts contain more than 15 micrograms of phylloquinone per 100 grams of nuts. Of the fruits analyzed, the mean phylloquinone content of prunes, kiwifruit, avocado, certain berries, grapes and figs ranged from 15.6 to 59.5 micrograms/100 grams of fruit. All other fruits analyzed contained less than 10 micrograms of phylloquinone per 100 grams of fruit. There were no systematic regional or seasonal differences in phylloquinone content found in nuts or fruits. In conclusion, most nuts and fruits are not important dietary sources of vitamin K. The data from this study will assist dietitians in counseling patients using the oral anticoagulant,warfarin, so patients can consume a healthy diet including fruits and nuts, without compromising the stability of their oral anticaogulation therapy.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page