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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluating Airborne Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Imagery for Citrus Orchard Surveys

Authors
item FLETCHER, REGINALD
item Escobar, David
item Skaria, Mani - TX A&M CITRUS-K'VILLE

Submitted to: HortTechnology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 3, 2003
Publication Date: January 1, 2004
Citation: Fletcher, R.S., Escobar, D.E., Skaria, M. 2004. Evaluating airborne normalized difference vegetation index imagery for citrus orchard surveys. HortTechnology. 14(1):91-94.

Interpretive Summary: The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) provides relative estimates of vegetation vigor, density, and health. Little information is available on the application of NDVI imagery for citriculture. The objective of this study was to evaluate airborne NDVI imagery for assessing tree conditions in citrus orchards. Stressed trees were easily detected in the images, and field survey plans were readily developed using the NDVI imagery. These findings suggest that airborne NDVI imagery can be used as a tool to assess tree conditions in citrus groves. Findings should be of interest to citrus growers, extension agents, agricultural consultants, and private surveying companies.

Technical Abstract: The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) provides relative estimates of vegetation vigor, density, and health. Little information is available on the application of NDVI imagery for citriculture. The objective of this study was to evaluate airborne NDVI imagery for assessing tree conditions in citrus (Citrus L.) orchards. Images of two south Texas citrus groves having stressed and non-stressed trees were evaluated qualitatively. Stressed trees were easily distinguished from non-stressed trees in the images. The images were also helpful for developing survey plans of the citrus groves. These results indicated that NDVI images could be used as a tool to assess tree conditions in citrus groves. Findings should be of interest to citrus growers, extension agents, agricultural consultants, and private surveying companies.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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