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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Experimental Chlorate Product Treatment to Reduce Food Borne Pathogenic Bacteria in Ruminant and Monogastric Food Animals

Authors
item Callaway, Todd
item Anderson, Robin
item Edrington, Thomas
item Jung, Yong Soo
item Genovese, Kenneth
item Bischoff, Kenneth
item Poole, Toni
item Elder, Robert
item Harvey, Roger
item Nisbet, David

Submitted to: Conference on Gastrointestinal Function
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 13, 2003
Publication Date: March 20, 2003
Citation: CALLAWAY, T.R., ANDERSON, R.C., EDRINGTON, T.S., JUNG, Y., GENOVESE, K.J., BISCHOFF, K.M., POOLE, T.L., ELDER, R.O., HARVEY, R.B., NISBET, D.J. EXPERIMENTAL CHLORATE PRODUCT TREATMENT TO REDUCE FOOD BORNE PATHOGENIC BACTERIA IN RUMINANT AND MONOGASTRIC FOOD ANIMALS. CONFERENCE ON GASTROINTESTINAL FUNCTION.

Technical Abstract: Pathogenic bacteria that cause human food borne illness can live within the gastrointestinal tract of food animals. Many of these bacteria do not affect animal production, but do pose a threat to consumers via meat and dairy products. Over 76 million cases of food borne illness occur each year in the U.S.; many of these cases are linked to consumption of contaminated meat products. Some of the most prevalent food borne pathogenic bacteria share a common trait, the ability to respire anaerobically using nitrate. This reduction is accomplished via the intracellular enzyme nitrate reductase (NR); however, NR does not differentiate between nitrate and its valence state analog chlorate, which can be reduced to cytotoxic chlorite. When added to pure and mixed cultures, chlorate killed E. coli and Salmonella within 24 h. Preliminary in vivo studies indicated that chlorate supplementation reduced E. coli O157:H7, wild-type E. coli and Salmonella in cattle, sheep and swine, respectively. Therefore, an experimental chlorate-containing product (XCP) has been developed for use in monogastric and ruminant animals. XCP treatment significantly reduced E. coli concentrations including the enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 concentrations in sheep, and significantly reduced wild-type E. coli concentrations in finishing cattle. XCP treatment also significantly reduced Salmonella concentrations in the gastrointestinal tract of growing swine but did not affect Salmonella contamination of the tonsils of swine experimentally inoculated with Salmonella during lairage. These results indicate that XCP could be a viable pre-harvest intervention strategy to reduce some food borne pathogenic bacteria in food animals.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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