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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Ulmaceae

Authors
item Fu, L - CHINESE ACAD OF SCIENCES
item Xin, Y - SHANDONG UNIVERSITY
item Whittemore, Alan

Submitted to: Flora of China
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 29, 2002
Publication Date: February 2, 2004
Citation: Fu, L., Yiqun, X., Whittemore, A.T. 2004. Ulmaceae for The Flora of China. Flora of China. v:5, pp:1-19.

Interpretive Summary: This contribution will form a section of the Flora of China, a manual that provides up-to-date information on the taxonomy, distribution, and ecological status of all plants that are wild or invasive in China (over ten percent of the plant species in the world), together with a guide for identification, aimed at professional and sophisticated amateur users. Ulmaceae is a family of great importance in horticulture, and a great deal of valuable germplasm originated in China (for example, Ulmus parvifoia, U. pumila, Zelkova serrata and Celtis sinensis). The taxonomy, distribution, and ecological status of all species of Ulmaceae that are wild or invasive in China is reevaluated, based primarily on a thorough reexamination of available herbarium specimens, and a guide for identification is supplied. Forty-six species in eight genera are included, several of which are important components of forests or riparian habitats. Several of these species are important horticulturally in the United States, and others have great horticultural potential. This contribution provides up-to-date information on the biology of this group of species, along with identification aids, clarifying the relationships and identification of all Ulmaceae native to China. It will be used to identify plants and to ensure a stable, meaningful classification and nomenclature, by professional botanists in China and the West, and by plant breeders and germplasm collectors who utilize these species.

Technical Abstract: The family Ulmaceae is treated for the Flora of China, a detailed floristic manual for China published by an international scientific consortium. Eight genera and 46 species are recognized; the largest genera are Ulmus (21 species), Celtis (11 species), and Trema (six species). Morphological descriptions, dichotomous keys, and brief summaries of geographical and ecological distribution, economic use, and taxonomic notes are given for each of them. Several of the species are important components of forests or riparian habitats. Many are used for timber, and some are locally important sources of fiber or seed oils.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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