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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of sticky traps for monitoring cotton fleahopper movement into cotton

Authors
item Suh, Charles
item Spurgeon, Dale
item Knutson, Allen - TEXAS A&M UNIV

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 7, 2003
Publication Date: May 15, 2003
Citation: Suh, C.P., Spurgeon, D.W., Knutson, A. 2003. Evaluation of sticky traps for monitoring cotton fleahopper movement into cotton. Proceedings of Beltwide Cotton Conference,Memphis, TN, January 6-10, 2003. p. 1444-1447.

Interpretive Summary: The cotton fleahopper is a serious insect pest that attacks cotton and reduces yield. Current methods for detecting fleahopper infestations in cotton are generally viewed by producers as too labor-intensive and time-consuming. Consequently, fleahopper treatment decisions are typically based on other factors (e.g., plant stage or need to treat for other insects). However, because the timing and intensity of fleahopper movement into cotton varies, insecticide applications for cotton fleahoppers are often mis-timed or unnecessary, or are required but not applied. Development of a practical trapping system could improve cotton fleahopper management efforts by alerting producers of fleahopper movement into cotton, and by potentially indicating the intensity of movement and infestations levels in the field. Tent-like traps and two color forms of sticky traps (yellow and white) were evaluated for their ability to capture fleahoppers entering cotton. Tent-like traps showed little potential as a monitoring tool for fleahoppers. Sticky traps, on the other hand, showed considerable promise for this use. Based solely on the magnitude of captures, yellow sticky traps placed immediately above plants in the field exhibited the greatest potential for monitoring fleahopper movement into cotton. Should trap access or field operations restrict placement of traps to field borders, yellow sticky traps placed at ground-level provided the best alternative to in-field traps. Our preliminary results identify several trapping parameters (e.g., trap placement and color) that should be considered in the development of a trap-based cotton fleahopper monitoring system and suggest continued investigation is warranted.

Technical Abstract: Field studies were initiated in 2001 to determine the feasibility of using sticky or malaise traps to detect cotton fleahopper, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter), movement into cotton. Yellow and white sticky traps were positioned at three heights (ground level, 1 and 2 m above the soil surface) on the field border, and immediately above the plant canopy on the 30th row. Malaise traps were placed only on the field border. Despite the use of kill strips, entrances to malaise capture containers were frequently blocked by large insects or spider webs, and predation on captured fleahoppers was commonly observed. Consequently, counts of captured fleahoppers were low (less than or equal to 5) in each trap and many counts were zeros. Based on these observations, the malaise traps used have little potential for monitoring cotton fleahopper movement into cotton. In contrast, commercially available sticky traps show considerable promise for this use. Border sticky traps set at ground level tended to capture more cotton fleahoppers than border traps set at the other heights, but captured significantly fewer fleahoppers than sticky traps placed inside the field. Yellow traps generally captured more fleahoppers than white traps for in-field and border traps. Based solely on the magnitude of trap captures, yellow sticky traps maintained just above the crop canopy in the field interior exhibited the greatest potential for monitoring fleahopper movement into cotton. Should field operations or trap access restrict trap placement to field borders, yellow traps placed at ground level would provide the best alternative to in-field traps. Our preliminary results identify several trapping parameters (e.g., trap placement and color) that should be considered in the development of a trap-based fleahopper monitoring system and suggest continued investigations are warranted.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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