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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Ribotype Characterization and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Campylobacter Coli Isolates from Swine

Authors
item Sheffield, Cynthia
item Hume, Michael
item Droleskey, Robert
item Harvey, Roger
item Bischoff, Kenneth

Submitted to: Online Journal of Veterinary Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 2, 2003
Publication Date: May 22, 2003
Citation: SHEFFIELD, C.L., HUME, M.E., DROLESKEY, R.E., HARVEY, R.B., BISCHOFF, K.M. RIBOTYPE CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILES OF CAMPYLOBACTER COLI ISOLATES FROM SWINE. Online Journal of Veterinary Research. 2003. v. 7. p. 52-58.

Interpretive Summary: Campylobacter, a bacteria commonly found in pigs, is the cause of an estimated 2.5 million cases of human foodborne illness each year. In this study, a small number of Campylobacter was collected from the feces of adult, female pigs and 21 day old piglets, which were housed in the same commercial production barn. Some of the piglets were the offspring of the adult female pigs. The bacterial samples were analyzed for their individual genetic makeup by an automated system called a RiboPrinter **R. The resulting ribotype analysis was used to determine if the bacteria were related genetically. Sixty-two percent of the pigs were found to have unrelated Campylobacter in their feces, and the adult female pigs did not share any Campylobacter of an identical genetic makeup with their offspring. However, genetically identical Campylobacter were found in the offspring in two sets of littermates. The collected bacteria were also tested to determine if specific chemical (antibacterial) agents could be used to kill the bacteria. All of the Campylobacter collected could be killed by the agent, Erythromycin, but none of the bacteria could be killed by the agents, Lincomycin and Tobramycin. This study shows that many genetically unrelated Campylobacter can be found at a single pig barn. Since Campylobacter represents a serious threat to the health of all consumers, it would be worth while to gain a more complete picture of the Campylobacter present in commercial production barns by collection and analysis of a larger number of samples.

Technical Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the genetic relatedness and antibiotic sensitivity profiles of Campylobacter coli isolates from sows and piglets housed in an integrated swine production facility. Sample Population: Ninety-nine isolates of Campylobacter coli were collected from 3 sows (Yorkshire-Landrace) and 18 piglets (Yorkshire-Landrace X Duroc or Hampshire) housed in a common farrowing barn. Procedure: When piglets were weaned (21 day of age) fecal samples were collected for the sows and rectal samples were collected from the piglets. Isolation of Campylobacter coli was performed using an enrichment broth and restrictive media under microaerophilic conditions. Results: The Campylobacter coli isolates segregated into 20 ribogroups and exhibited 32 antibiotic susceptibility profiles. The Ribogroup (224-373-S-5) contained 35 isolates from eleven animals. Thirty-eight percent of the animals exhibited a single ribogroup, while 10% of the animals exhibited four ribogroups. No discernible pattern of ribogroup relatedness was observed among the sows and piglets or among littermates. Conclusion: The data suggests a high level of diversity in both ribotypic patterns and antibiotic sensitivity profiles among the Campylobacter coli isolated from related pigs housed in a single facility. Further, no evidence was found for a direct transfer of specific Campylobacter coli ribotypes from a sow to her piglets.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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