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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: ARS Research on Natural Products for Pest Management

Authors
item Akey, David
item Arthur, Franklin
item DE Lucca Ii, Anthony
item Gibson, Donna
item Harrison, Howard
item Peterson, Joseph
item Gealy, David
item Tworkoski, Thomas
item Wilson, Charles
item Morris, John

Submitted to: Pest Management Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 20, 2002
Publication Date: June 15, 2003
Citation: AKEY, D.H., ARTHUR, F.H., DE LUCCA II, A.J., GIBSON, D.M., HARRISON JR, H.F., PETERSON, J.K., GEALY, D.R., TWORKOSKI, T., WILSON, C.L., MORRIS, J.B. ARS RESEARCH ON NATURAL PRODUCTS FOR PEST MANAGEMENT. PEST MANAGEMENT SCIENCE. 2003. v. 59. p. 708-717.

Interpretive Summary: ARS has many research scientists that work to develop the knowledge base and strategies to control plant pests and diseases that are environmentally sustainable and economically feasible. In this chapter for a special edition of Pest Management Science, Dr. Stephen Duke, USDA, ARS, Natural Products Laboratory, University, MS, summarized the wide variety of research activities of ARS in this area. The chapter includes work on discovery and testing of natural products, identification of new target sites, plant breeding strategies, and use of new technologies to expedite the discovery process. The work should be of interest to scientists in the area as well as to customers and stakeholders of ARS.

Technical Abstract: Recent research of the Agricultural Research Service of USDA on the use of natural products to manage pests is summarized. Studies of the use of both phytochemicals and diatomaceous earth to manage insect pests are discussed. Chemically characterized compounds, such as a saponin from pepper (Capsicum fruitescens), benzaldehyde, chitosan, and 2,deoxy-D-glucose, are being studied as natural fungicides. Resin glycosides for pathogen resistance in sweet potato and residues of semi-tropical leguminous plants for nematode control are also under investigation. Bioassay-guided isolation of compounds with potential use as herbicides or herbicide leads is underway at several locations. New natural phytotoxin molecular target sites (asparagine synthetase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase) have been discovered. Weed control in sweet potato and rice by allelopathy is under investigation. Molecular approaches to enhance allelopathy in sorghum are also being undertaken. The genes for polyketide synthases involved in production of pesticidal polyketide compounds in fungi are discovered to provide clues for pesticide discovery. Gene expression profiles in response to fungicides and herbicides are being generated as a tool to both more fully understand mode of action and to rapidly determine the molecular target site of new, natural fungicides and herbicides.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014