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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Linking Peanut Allergenicity to the Processes of Maturation, Curing and Roasting

Authors
item Chung, Si-Yin
item Butts, Christopher
item Maleki, Soheila
item Champagne, Elaine

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 14, 2003
Publication Date: July 1, 2003
Citation: Chung, S., Butts, C.L., Maleki, S.J., Champagne, E.T. 2003. Linking peanut allergenicity to the processes of maturation, curing and roasting. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Interpretive Summary: The processes of peanut maturation, curing and roasting are known to have an important role in peanut flavors. One of these processes (i.e., roasting) has been found to have an effect on the allergenic property (AP) of peanuts. To determine if the other processes (i.e., maturation and curing) affect AP, mature and immature roasted peanuts, and peanuts cured at different temperatures (35- 77 oC) were respectively tested for their AP and sugar-protein reaction products (SRP). Peanuts with and without stress proteins, which are induced under stress conditions or during peanut maturation and curing, were also tested. Results showed that mature roasted peanuts exhibited a higher AP and SRP level than immature roasted peanuts. Curing at a higher temperature such as 77 oC also gave a profile of higher levels of AP and SRP. These levels were seen to be higher in peanuts with stress proteins than without stress proteins. Roasting increased stress protein level and AP. From these results, the processes of maturation and curing, in conjunction with roasting, may be associated with AP, suggesting that improperly performing these processes may lead to changes in the allergenic property of peanuts.

Technical Abstract: The processes of peanut maturation, curing and roasting are known to have an important role in peanut flavors. One of these processes (i.e., roasting) has been found to have an effect on allergenicity. To determine if the other processes (i.e., maturation and curing) affect allergenicity, mature and immature roasted peanuts, and peanuts cured at different temperatures (35-77 oC) were respectively tested for IgE binding and advanced glycation end-adducts (AGEs). Peanuts with and without stress proteins, which are associated with peanut maturation and curing, were also tested. Results showed that mature roasted peanuts exhibited a higher IgE binding and AGEs level than immature roasted peanuts. Curing temperatures between 35-60 oC gave no difference in the profiles. However, a higher curing temperature (i.e., 77 oC) exhibited a profile of higher levels of AGEs and IgE binding. These levels were seen to be higher in peanuts with stress proteins than without stress proteins. Roasting increased stress protein level and IgE binding. Form these results, the processes of maturation and curing, in conjunction with roasting, may be associated with allergenicity, suggesting that improperly performing these processes may lead to changes in the allergenic property of peanuts. Of the three processes discussed, only curing and roasting can be controlled. The degree of maturation is somewhat controlled by the growers' choice of when to harvest.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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