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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Occurrence of Common Groundsel Rust on the East Coast of the United States

Authors
item BRUCKART, WILLIAM
item Neal, Joseph - NC STATE UNIV.
item Senesac, Andrew - LI HORT. RES. & EXT. CTR.
item Travis, Matthew - MD DEPT. OF AGR.

Submitted to: Proceedings of Northeastern Weed Science Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 2003
Publication Date: January 1, 2003
Citation: BRUCKART, W.L., NEAL, J., SENESAC, A., TRAVIS, M. THE OCCURRENCE OF COMMON GROUNDSEL RUST ON THE EAST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES. PROCEEDINGS OF NORTHEASTERN WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY. 57:119. 2003.

Technical Abstract: A British isolate of the rust fungus, Puccinia lagenophorae, has been under evaluation for biological control of common groundsel (Senecio vulgaris) in the U.S. The fungus has been studied extensively in Europe, where it may have caused significant reductions of S. vulgaris populations. Research in Europe and Australia indicate P. lagenophorae is not limited to S. vulgaris; susceptibility of English daisy (Bellis perennis), pot marigold (Calendula officinalis), and at least two other species of Senecio has been noted [1]. A limited host range determination in the present study showed that English daisy also could be infected but not damaged by the British acquisition of P. lagenophorae. Pot marigold was not infected in these tests. No other plant has been tested, including any of the nearly 100 species of Senecio native to North America. In 2001, there were two reports that P. lagenophorae was discovered in the U.S. on S. vulgaris [2] and on English daisy [3]. This information was shared at both the 2002 NEWSS and APS Potomac Division meetings, with the specific request for specimens, if they were found on the East Coast. As a result, accessions were sent from three states, widely separated, on the East Coast. The first sample was collected near Riverhead, NY on January 18, 2002. Two samples were collected in North Carolina on April 4 and again on August 13, 2002, and another sample came from Calvert County, Maryland, collected on May 21, 2002. All three samples were found in nurseries. Thus far, only the isolate from Maryland caused infections on groundsel plants, but all have characteristic aeciospores and aecia for P. lagenophorae. The issues raised in 2002 concerning the discovery of P. lagenophorae remain, and may be more critical in light of the discovery of P. lagenophorae on the East Coast of the United States. We are still interested in knowing how much damage the disease will cause to common groundsel and, more specifically, will it cause reduction in stand density throughout the range of common groundsel in North America? Of greater concern is whether North American species of Senecio and plants in related genera are susceptible and will be damaged by infections from P. lagenophorae.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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