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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Historical perspectives: human interactions with clavicipitalean fungi

Authors
item White, James - RUTGERS U., NJ
item Bacon, Charles
item Hywel-Jones, Nigel - NSTDA, BANGKOK,THAILAND
item Spatafora, Joseph - OSU, CORVALLIS, OR

Submitted to: Clavicipitalean Fungi
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2002
Publication Date: June 1, 2003
Citation: White, J.F., Bacon, C.W., Hywel-Jones, N.L., Spatafora, J.W. 2003. Historical perspectives: human interactions with clavicipitalean fungi. In: White, J.F., Bacon, C.W., Hywel-Jones, N.L., Spatafora, J.W., editors. Clavicipitalean Fungi: Evolutionary Biology, Chemistry, Biocontrol, and Cultural Impacts. Marcel Dekker, New York, NY. p. 1-15.

Interpretive Summary: A group of scientists described the nature of host and fungus relationships that occurred within a relatively small family consisting of fungi that parasitize plants, nematodes, fungi, and insect. These associations are described along evolutionary lines that result in the final present day outcome of a strong physiological adaptation to hosts resulting in highly compatible symptomless expressions referred to as fungal endophytes. Specific host niches are explored within all genera of fungi contained with the family Clavicipitaceae and included with this are the members that are associated first with insects, and the jump from insect to plants with an initial association that is superficially with plants. Also, evolutionary arguments are presented to include the biochemistry, secondary metabolism, and the nature of host modifications as well as an hypothesis to account for the loss of sexuality, which is represented by the symptomless endophytes that are considered the climax association in the Clavicipitaceae family. The climax association during the evolution of the family is represented by such endophytes as those found living in tall fescue. A group of scientists described the nature of host and fungus relationships that occurred within a relatively small family consisting of fungi that parasitize plants, nematodes, fungi, and insect. These associations are described along evolutionary lines that result in the final present day outcome of a strong physiological adaptation to hosts resulting in highly compatible symptomless expressions referred to as fungal endophytes. Specific host niches are explored within all genera of fungi contained with the family Clavicipitaceae and included with this are the members that are associated first with insects, and the jump from insect to plants with an initial association that is superficially with plants. Also, evolutionary arguments are presented to include the biochemistry, secondary metabolism, and the nature of host modifications as well as an hypothesis to account for the loss of sexuality, which is represented by the symptomless endophytes that are considered the climax association in the Clavicipitaceae family. The climax association during the evolution of the family is represented by such endophytes as those found living in tall fescue.

Technical Abstract: Book Chapter in CLAVICIPITALEAN FUNGI, edited by J.F. White, Jr., C. W. Bacon, N. Hywel-Jones, and C. W. Bacon. Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, New York, 2003.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014