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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evidence for Nematode Defense in Symbiotic Grasses

Authors
item Bacon, Charles
item White, James - PLANT PATH/RUTGERS UNIV.

Submitted to: Clavicipitalean Fungi
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2002
Publication Date: June 1, 2003
Citation: BACON, C.W., WHITE, J.F. EVIDENCE FOR NEMATODE DEFENSE IN SYMBIOTIC GRASSES. BOOK - CLAVICIPITALEAN FUNGI. 2003. Marcel Dekker, New York, NY. p.549-569.

Interpretive Summary: Tall fescue is internally infected with a fungus. This endophytic fungus is responsible for several survival aspects of the grass that is used as the predominant forage grass in the southeastern United States. Drought tolerance, nitrogen scavenging, deep rooting, resistance to fungal diseases, and persistence under livestock grazing are some of the survival aspects that are attributed to the fungus. This chapter concerns the potential use of this endophytic fungus for yet another survival feature of the grass and that is nematode resistance. Nematode resistance in endophyte-infected tall fescue is reviewed as more of an observational feature of the grass. However, the authors present several possible toxins that may be responsible for resistance, as well as a discussion on the mechanism of how an endophytic fungus might prevent the infection of such a deadly pest of grasses, especially in certain soil types, without the direct intervention of a toxin. Tall fescue is internally infected with a fungus. This endophytic fungus is responsible for several survival aspects of the grass that is used as the predominant forage grass in the southeastern United States. Drought tolerance, nitrogen scavenging, deep rooting, resistance to fungal diseases, and persistence under livestock grazing are some of the survival aspects that are attributed to the fungus. This chapter concerns the potential use of this endophytic fungus for yet another survival feature of the grass and that is nematode resistance. Nematode resistance in endophyte-infected tall fescue is reviewed as more of an observational feature of the grass. However, the authors present several possible toxins that may be responsible for resistance, as well as a discussion on the mechanism of how an endophytic fungus might prevent the infection of such a deadly pest of grasses, especially in certain soil types, without the direct intervention of a toxin.

Technical Abstract: Book Chapter in CLAVICIPITALEAN FUNGI, edited by J.F. White, Jr., C.W.Bacon, N. Hywel-Jones and J.W. Sptatfora. Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, New York, 2003.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014