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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Polyphenolics Can Localize Within the Brains of Aged Rats Fed a Blueberry-Supplemented Diet

Authors
item Shukitt-Hale, Barbara
item Andres-Lacueva, C - TUFTS UNIV
item Galli, Rachel - SIMMONS COLLEGE
item Jauregui, O - UNIV OF BARCELONA
item Joseph, James

Submitted to: Society for Neuroscience Abstracts and Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 16, 2002
Publication Date: November 1, 1999
Citation: Shukitt-Hale, B., Andres-Lacueva, C., Galli, R.L., Jauregui, O., Lamuela-Raventos, R.M., and Joseph, J.A. Polyphenolics can localize within the brains of aged rats fed a blueberry - supplemented diet. Soc. Neurosci. Abs. 2002, 28, 294.6. 

Technical Abstract: Research has shown that fruits and vegetables that have high levels of polyphenolics (flavonoids) displayed high total antioxidant activity and anti-inflammatory properties. Our laboratory found that various fruit and vegetable extracts, particularly blueberry (BB), were effective in reversing age-related deficits in neuronal signaling and behavioral parameters following 8 weeks of feeding, possibly due to their polyphenolic content. However, it was unclear if these phytonutrients were able to directly access the brain from dietary BB supplementation (BBS). The present study made these determinations by examining whether different classes of polyphenolics could be found in brain areas associated with cognitive and/or motor performance following BBS. Thus, 19 month old F344 rats were fed a control or 2% BB diet for 8-10 weeks. LC-MS analyses of anthocyanins, flavonols, and hydroxycinnamic acids were carried out in the food and subsequently in different brain regions of BBS and control rats. Evidence to date indicates that several anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-galactoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside, & malvidin-4-glucoside) and flavonols (kaempherol-3-rutinoside) were found in cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of the BBS rats, but not the controls, suggesting that these polyphenolic compounds were able to cross the blood brain barrier and localize in various brain regions important for learning and memory. These findings suggest that these compounds may deliver their antioxidant and signaling modifying capabilities centrally.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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