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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Nutritional Quality of Shinnery Oak Buds and Catkins in Response to Burning Or Herbivory

Authors
item Boyd, Chad
item Vermeire, Lance - TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY
item Bidwell, Terrence - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV
item Lochmiller, R - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Southwestern Naturalist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 23, 2000
Publication Date: September 20, 2001
Citation: BOYD,C.S., VERMEIRE,L.T., BIDWELL,T.G., LOCHMILLER,R.L., NUTRITIONAL QUALITY OF SHINNERY OAK BUDS AND CATKINS IN RESPONSE TO BURNING OR HERBIVORY, SOUTHWESTERN NATURALIST 46(3):295-301, 2001.

Interpretive Summary: Catkins and buds of shinnery oak (Quercus havardii) are a good source for the lesser prairie chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) and perhaps other wildlife species. It is therefore important for managers to understand how different vegetation treatments may affect nutritional quality of shinnery oak catkins and buds. Objectives of our study were to determine nutritional quality of shinnery oak catkins and buds, evaluate the effect of grazing on bud nutritional quality, and determine the influence of burning and season of burn on nutritional quality of catkins and buds. The study consisted of 2 grazing treatments and 4 burning treatments. Total phenolics were higher in grazed plots compared to ungrazed plots, but crude protein did not differ by grazing treatment. Fiber content was lower in catkins than grazed or ungrazed buds. Prescribed burning decreased ash content of buds, but no other measure of nutritional quality was affected for either buds or catkins. The nutritional quality of shinnery oak buds and catkins is high, but phenolic levels ranging from 15.0 to 20.4% reduce its forage value for some species.

Technical Abstract: Catkins and buds of shinnery oak (Quercus havardii) are a good source for the lesser prairie chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) and perhaps other wildlife species. It is therefore important for managers to understand how different vegetation treatments may affect nutritional quality of shinnery oak catkins and buds. Objectives of our study were to determine nutritional quality of shinnery oak catkins and buds, evaluate the effect of grazing on bud nutritional quality, and determine the influence of burning and season of burn on nutritional quality of catkins and buds. The study consisted of 2 grazing treatments and 4 burning treatments. Total phenolics were higher in grazed plots compared to ungrazed plots, but crude protein did not differ by grazing treatment. Fiber content was lower in catkins than grazed or ungrazed buds. Prescribed burning decreased ash content of buds, but no other measure of nutritional quality was affected for either buds or catkins. The nutritional quality of shinnery oak buds and catkins is high, but phenolic levels ranging from 15.0 to 20.4% reduce its forage value for some species.

Last Modified: 7/27/2014
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