Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Sedating Concentrations of Selected Anesthetics on the Stress Response in Sunshine Hybrid Striped Bass.

Authors
item Davis, Kenneth
item Griffin, Billy

Submitted to: Aquaculture America Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 30, 2002
Publication Date: February 18, 2003
Citation: DAVIS JR, K.B., GRIFFIN, B.R. EFFECTS OF SEDATING CONCENTRATIONS OF SELECTED ANESTHETICS ON THE STRESS RESPONSE IN SUNSHINE HYBRID STRIPED BASS.. AQUACULTURE AMERICA CONFERENCE. 2003. p.76

Technical Abstract: During the production and commercial culture of sunshine hybrid striped bass the fish are seined, graded and transported up to six times before they reach market. Each of these handling events is difficult for the fish and may induce mortality or stress. Sublethal stress to the fish can suppress the immune system and result in making the fish more susceptible to pathogens. If any compounds are to be useful for handling and transport a concentration which induces sedation and not full anesthesia is desirable. A physiological state where the fish can maintain normal posture and active opercular movement, but are less excitable, and which reduced the magnitude and duration of the physiological response should be of great use in aquaculture. We used plasma cortisol, glucose and chloride concentrations to evaluate the effects of exposure to, and low water stress while exposed to tricaine methanesulfonate, metomidate, quinaldine, quinaldine sulfate, clove oil, Aqui-S and sodium chloride alone and in combination with sodium chloride. Fish exposed to metomidate had the least physiological changes during the experiment followed by sodium chloride and MS-222. MS-222 is the only approved compound for use as an anesthetic in aquaculture and it appears to provide some suppression of physiological stress. Metomidate provided the best protection; however, since it is not approved use of this compound cannot be recommended.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page