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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Impact of Ipm Practices on Insect Populations in Retail Pet Stores

Authors
item Roesli, Rennie - KANSAS STATE UNIV
item Subramanyam, Bhadriraju - KANSAS STATE UNIV
item Campbell, James
item Kemp, Kim - NESTLE PURINA CO

Submitted to: Stored Products Protection International Working Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 2, 2002
Publication Date: July 30, 2003
Citation: ROESLI, R., SUBRAMANYAM, B., CAMPBELL, J.F., KEMP, K. IMPACT OF IPM PRACTICES ON INSECT POPULATIONS IN RETAIL PET STORES. STORED PRODUCTS PROTECTION INTERNATIONAL WORKING CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS. 2003. pp. 410-419.

Technical Abstract: Stored-product insect infestations in retail pet stores cost pet food manufacturers millions of dollars annually. There are no studies documenting effectiveness of pest management practices on stored-product insect populations in pet stores. Our study was designed to determine species associated with eight pet stores in Kansas and to evaluate impact of chemical and non-chemical intervention on insect populations. Food and pheromone-baited traps were used to estimate numbers of stored-product beetles and the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner). Traps were placed in a grid pattern in each store, and trap catches were recorded every 1-3 weeks. Spatial analysis of trap catch data were used for monitoring infestations in retail pet stores and for evaluating effectiveness of pest management measures. Pest management measures used included sanitation (sweeping, vacuuming and/or discarding infested products) or sanitation in combination with an insect growth regulator, hydroprene 9% EC, or a pyrethroid, cyfluthrin 20 WP. Each treatment (sanitation or sanitation plus pesticide application) was replicated in two stores. Two stores that were left untreated served as the control treatment. A total of 41,266 adult insects and 3,032 larvae belonging to 23 families and 7 orders were captured in traps. Infestations were generally associated with bird seed, small animal foods, or spilled food. Sanitation in conjunction with hydroprene or cyfluthrin applications on targeted floor areas reduced beetle numbers but they did not greatly reduce Indianmeal moth numbers.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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