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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Nutrient and Food Intake in the Lower Mississippi Delta (Lmd): a Rural Population Survey

Authors
item Champagne, Catherine
item Bogle, Margaret
item Weber, Judith
item Horton, Jacqueline
item Yadrick, Kathy
item Simpson, Pippa
item Allen, H - PENNINGTON BIOMED RES CTR
item Gossett, J - ACHRI, DAC
item Simon, Wanda - ACHRI, DAC
item Kramer, Tim

Submitted to: Dietary Assessment Methods International Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2002
Publication Date: January 26, 2003
Citation: CHAMPAGNE, C.M., BOGLE, M.L., WEBER, J., HORTON, J., YADRICK, K., SIMPSON, P., ALLEN, H.R., GOSSETT, J., SIMON, W., KRAMER, T.R. NUTRIENT AND FOOD INTAKE IN THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI DELTA (LMD): A RURAL POPULATION SURVEY. DIETARY ASSESSMENT METHODS INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS. Chiang Rai, Thailand. 2003. Abstract No. E1.7.

Technical Abstract: Very little research has been directed towards the food and nutrient intake of rural and minority populations, particularly those residing in the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) region of AR, LA and MS. FOODS 2000 was a cross sectional telephone survey of the rural LMD population. Food intake data were collected from this culturally diverse population to compare with national survey data and to provide baseline data that could be used to develop nutritional interventions. Subjects were 1751 adults and 485 children. Food intake was obtained from a 24-hr recall administered by computer assisted telephone interview using the multiple pass method. Means and comparisons with the overall US population from the USDA's Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals 1994-96, 98 (CSFII) were generated and the reported food intake of ethnic groups within the LMD compared to CSFII. LMD residentsÂż energy intake was not different, but specific nutrients and food groups differed significantly (P<0.005) compared to CSFII. Percent energy from total fat was 2% higher (35% vs 33%), as was discretionary fat intake (62g vs 58g). More cholesterol was consumed (282mg vs 261mg). Meat intake was higher (5.2 oz compared with 4.8 oz). Added sugars were 25% higher for LMD residents than in CSFII. However, lower intakes were noted for LMD residents compared to the national data for fiber (13g vs 16g), vitamin C (83mg vs 100mg), vitamin A (713RE vs 994RE), Mg (236mg vs 269mg), K (2376mg vs 2668mg), Ca (707mg vs 804mg). Delta adults had 20% lower intake of fruits and vegetables and generally poorer adherence to Food Guide Pyramid recommendations. African American adults in the Delta generally consumed poorer diets than Delta Caucasians. Children in the Delta on average had diets similar to the children in the CSFII population, but lower intakes were noted for vitamins A, C, riboflavin, B6, and calcium and iron. Data from FOODS 2000 suggest that there are areas of concern regarding the nutritional intakes of both adults and children of all ethnic groups in the LMD. These data will be helpful in developing sustainable community based nutrition interventions in this region. Supported by USDA, ARS Project #6251-53000-003-00D.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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