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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Food Intake Recording Software System (Firsst) Is Valid among 4th Grade Children

Authors
item Baranowski, Thomas
item Islam, Noemi - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MEDICIN
item Baranowski, Janice
item Cullen, Karen
item Myres, Dawnell - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MEDICIN
item Marsh, Tara - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MEDICIN
item Demoor, Carl - UT MD ANDERSON CANCER CTR

Submitted to: Journal Of The American Dietetic Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2002
Publication Date: March 1, 2002
Citation: Baranowski,T., Islam,N., Baranowski,J., Cullen,K.W., Myres,D., Marsh,T., De Moor,C. 2002. The food intake recording software system is valid among fourth-grade children. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 102(3):380-385.

Interpretive Summary: The objective of this research was to assess how accurately the Food Intake Recording Software System (FIRSSt) enabled children to report what they ate the previous day as compared to a dietitian conducted diet recall; and to test the effects of several procedures on accuracy of dietary report. We used a six-group design, systematically varying sequence of self-report (FIRSSt vs dietitian conducted recall), observation of school lunch and a procedure to encourage children to be more accurate. 138 fourth-grade students in 2 elementary schools were randomly assigned to groups. Accuracy of reported food consumption was measured in terms of matches, intrusions, and omissions among the FIRSSt, 24hDR, and as observed at school lunch the previous day. Students also completed self-report of performance with FIRSSt. When compared with school lunch observation for one meal, FIRSSt attained 46% accuracy, while a dietitian-conducted 24hDR obtained 59% accuracy rates. FIRSSt attained 60% accuracy rate against dietitian conducted recall for all meals in the previous day. There was no evidence of sequence of assessment affecting accuracy indicators. Children generally enjoyed completing FIRSSt. Hispanic children were more likely to report problems using FIRSSt. In summary, FIRSSt is somewhat less accurate than a dietitian-conducted 24hDR. However, the lower-cost of FIRSSt provides a promising method for assessing diet among children. Observation of consumption at school lunch may be reactive and artificially increase agreement.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this research was to assess how accurately the Food Intake Recording Software System (FIRSSt) enabled children to report what they ate the previous day as compared to a dietitian conducted diet recall; and to test the effects of several procedures on accuracy of dietary report. We used a six-group design, systematically varying sequence of self-report (FIRSSt vs dietitian conducted recall), observation of school lunch and a procedure to encourage children to be more accurate. 138 fourth-grade students in 2 elementary schools were randomly assigned to groups. Accuracy of reported food consumption was measured in terms of matches, intrusions, and omissions among the FIRSSt, 24hDR, and as observed at school lunch the previous day. Students also completed self-report of performance with FIRSSt. When compared with school lunch observation for one meal, FIRSSt attained 46% accuracy, while a dietitian-conducted 24hDR obtained 59% accuracy rates. FIRSSt attained 60% accuracy rate against dietitian conducted recall for all meals in the previous day. There was no evidence of sequence of assessment affecting accuracy indicators. Children generally enjoyed completing FIRSSt. Hispanic children were more likely to report problems using FIRSSt. In summary, FIRSSt is somewhat less accurate than a dietitian-conducted 24hDR. However, the lower-cost of FIRSSt provides a promising method for assessing diet among children. Observation of consumption at school lunch may be reactive and artificially increase agreement.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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