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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Children's Food Consumption Patterns Have Changed over Two Decades (1973-1994): the Bogalusa Heart Study

Authors
item Nicklas, Theresa
item Demory-Luce, Debby
item Yang, Su-Jau - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MED
item Baranowski, Thomas
item Zakeri, Issa - BAYLOR COLLEGE OF MED
item Berenson, Gerald - TULANE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Journal Of The American Dietetic Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2004
Publication Date: July 1, 2004
Citation: Nicklas, T., Demory-Luce, D., Yang, S., Baranowski, T., Zakeri, I., Berenson, G. 2004. Children's food consumption patterns have changed over two decades (1973-1994): the Bogalusa Heart Study. Journal Of The American Dietetic Association. 104(7):1127-1140.

Interpretive Summary: Food consumption patterns were examined among 10-year-old children from 1973 to 1994. Twenty-four hour dietary recalls were collected on a total of 1584 children who participated in one of seven cross-sectional surveys; with each sample representing a white-black composition of 65% and 35%, respectively. The percentage of children consuming, and the mean gram amount consumed, significantly decreased for fats/oils (p < 0.0001), desserts (p < 0.0001), candy (p < 0.0001), eggs (p < 0.001) and milk (p < 0.0001). In contrast, the percentage of children consuming, and the mean gram amount consumed, significantly increased for fruits/fruit juices (p < 0.01), mixed meats (p < 0.01), poultry (p < 0.0001) and cheese (p < 0.0001). Despite a significant decrease in the percentage of children consuming vegetables (p < 0.01) and beef (p < 0.01), the mean gram amount consumed did not change. The percentage of children consuming breads/grains, pork and snacks did not change, but the mean gram amount of salty snacks (p < 0.001) significantly increased and breads/grains (p < 0.01) and pork (p < 0.01) significantly decreased. The percentage of children consuming sweetened beverages (p < 0.01) and condiments (p < 0.001) decreased while the mean gram amount consumed increased (p < 0.05) and (p < 0.0001). The mean gram amount of lunch and dinner consumed increased (p < 0.0001) but snacks decreased (p < 0.0001), resulting in no change in total gram amount consumed in a 24-hour period. Trends in food consumption patterns of children should be considered in the design and implementation of population-based behavioral strategies for the promotion of health and prevention of chronic disease.

Technical Abstract: Food consumption patterns were examined among 10-year-old children from 1973 to 1994. Twenty-four hour dietary recalls were collected on a total of 1584 children who participated in one of seven cross-sectional surveys; with each sample representing a white-black composition of 65% and 35%, respectively. The percentage of children consuming, and the mean gram amount consumed, significantly decreased for fats/oils (p < 0.0001), desserts (p < 0.0001), candy (p < 0.0001), eggs (p < 0.001) and milk (p < 0.0001). In contrast, the percentage of children consuming, and the mean gram amount consumed, significantly increased for fruits/fruit juices (p < 0.01), mixed meats (p < 0.01), poultry (p < 0.0001) and cheese (p < 0.0001). Despite a significant decrease in the percentage of children consuming vegetables (p < 0.01) and beef (p < 0.01), the mean gram amount consumed did not change. The percentage of children consuming breads/grains, pork and snacks did not change, but the mean gram amount of salty snacks (p < 0.001) significantly increased and breads/grains (p < 0.01) and pork (p < 0.01) significantly decreased. The percentage of children consuming sweetened beverages (p < 0.01) and condiments (p < 0.001) decreased while the mean gram amount consumed increased (p < 0.05) and (p < 0.0001). The mean gram amount of lunch and dinner consumed increased (p < 0.0001) but snacks decreased (p < 0.0001), resulting in no change in total gram amount consumed in a 24-hour period. Trends in food consumption patterns of children should be considered in the design and implementation of population-based behavioral strategies for the promotion of health and prevention of chronic disease.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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