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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Effect of Two Louisiana Soils on Cane Juice Quality

Authors
item Godshall, Mary An - SPRI
item Spear, Scott - UNIV OF ALABAMA
item Johnson, Richard

Submitted to: American Society of Sugar Cane Technologists
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 20, 2002
Publication Date: April 20, 2002
Citation: Godshall, M., Spear, S.K., Johnson, R.M. 2002. The Effect of Two Louisiana Soils on Cane Juice Quality. Journal of the American Society Of Sugar Cane Technologists. 22:101-111.

Interpretive Summary: Louisiana sugarcane processors have recently expressed increased concerns over the presence of excess leaf material (trash) and sediment (soil) in the sugarcane shipped to the mill. As part of ongoing investigations on the effect of various field practices on the quality of cane juice in Louisiana, we noted that cane juice color decreased significantly when soil was added. In a study of the 1999/00 crop in Louisiana, with addition of 5% and 10% soil to the cane juice, it was noted that polysaccharide was also removed, the first time this had been reported. These observations run contrary to expectations that soil will degrade the quality of cane juice. Raw juice from green cane, which had been topped, but still retained side leaves, was treated with 10% added soil. Two soils from the Louisiana cane growing area, Sharkey clay and Norwood silty clay loam were tested. The juice was treated for 30 minutes in a shaker either at room temperature (25 C) or heated (80 C). Changes in pH, color, total polysaccharide, ash and filtration rate were noted. Both soils decreased color and total polysaccharide and increased the filtration rate. Juice pH and ash were not significantly changed. These findings indicate that the presence of excess soil in harvested sugarcane may not represent as significant a problem for processors as originally believed. The effects of soil on sugarcane processing machinery were not addressed in this work and may be significant. This information may prove useful to sugar processors throughout the state who must deal with harvested sugarcane that contains excess soil.

Technical Abstract: As part of ongoing investigations on the effect of various field practices on the quality of cane juice in Louisiana, we noted that cane juice color decreased significantly when soil was added to assess the effect of soil on cane juice quality. In a study of the 1999/00 crop in Louisiana, with addition of 5% and 10% soil to the cane juice, it was noted that polysaccharide was also removed, the first time this had been reported. These observations run contrary to expectations that soil will degrade the quality of cane juice. Raw juice from green cane, which had been topped, but still retained side leaves, was treated with 10% added soil. Two soils from the Louisiana cane growing area, Sharkey clay and Norwood silty clay loam were tested. The juice was treated for 30 minutes in a shaker either at room temperature (25 C) or heated (80 C). Changes in pH, color, total polysaccharide, ash and filtration rate were noted. Both soils decreased color and total polysaccharide and increased the filtration rate. pH and ash were not significantly changed.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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