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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Agricultural Bmps and Modeling for Sediment

Authors
item Bonta, James
item Wauchope, Robert

Submitted to: Workshop on Suspended Sediments and Solids
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 11, 2002
Publication Date: January 10, 2005
Citation: Bonta, J.V., Wauchope, R.D. 2005. Agricultural BMPs and modeling for sediment. In: Schubauer-Berigan, J.P., Minamyer, S., Hartzell, E., editors. Proceedings of A Workshop on Suspended Sediments and Solids, July 11-12, 2002, USEPA, Cincinnati, OH. p. C-34-C-39.

Interpretive Summary: Sustaining agricultural production for high commodity yields and quality has been a major goal of the agricultural community. One component of agricultural sustainability is the control of erosion and sediment transport on agricultural fields. Erosion degrades the soil resource and can affect nutrient and pesticide application rates, and transport through the soil profile and in direct runoff. This paper summarizes 17 broad classes of erosion control on agricultural lands, highlighting the positive and negative aspects of each. Newer erosion-control practices that have been investigated by the ARS are also briefly described. These include use of gypsum and polyacrylamide (PAM) as soil amendments, stiff grasses, and on-site erosion control using imprints. Gypsum and PAM enhance infiltration and stabilize the soil surface. Stiff grasses cause deposition of sediment upslope from a grass strip, but allow the water to flow through them. Imprinting controls sediment movement on a slope, while vegetation is established. Thirteen computer models developed by ARS are listed that can be used to simulate erosion and/or sediment yield from watersheds, along with three models for simulating weather for input to these models. The summary will be useful for land managers and regulatory agencies.

Technical Abstract: Sustaining agricultural production for high commodity yields and quality has been a major goal of the agricultural community. One component of agricultural sustainability is the control of erosion and sediment transport on agricultural fields. Erosion degrades the soil resource and can affect nutrient and pesticide application rates, and transport through the soil profile and in direct runoff. This paper summarizes 17 broad classes of erosion control on agricultural lands, highlighting the positive and negative aspects of each. Newer erosion-control practices that have been investigated by the ARS are also briefly described. These include use of gypsum and polyacrylamide (PAM) as soil amendments, stiff grasses, and on-site erosion control using imprints. Gypsum and PAM enhance infiltration and stabilize the soil surface. Stiff grasses cause deposition of sediment upslope from a grass strip, but allow the water to flow through them. Imprinting controls sediment movement on a slope, while vegetation is established. Thirteen computer models developed by ARS are listed that can be used to simulate erosion and/or sediment yield from watersheds, along with three models for simulating weather for input to these models. The summary will be useful for land managers and regulatory agencies.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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