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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Future of Scientific Publications: One Scientist's Perspective

Author
item Vandenberg, John

Submitted to: International Colloquium on Invertebrate Pathology and Microbial Control Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2002
Publication Date: September 1, 2002
Citation: VANDENBERG, J.D. THE FUTURE OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS: ONE SCIENTIST'S PERSPECTIVE. INTERNATIONAL COLOQUIM ON INVERTEBRATE PATHOLOGY AND MICROBIAL CONTROL. 2002. v. 8. p. 141-142.

Technical Abstract: The recent explosion of information, especially in digital form, is revolutionizing many fields of scientific endeavor, including the assorted venues scientists use to disseminate their research results. Scientists should take a keen interest in this nascent paradigm shift ­ it is already having a profound impact on all aspects of our work. Scientists have needs, now and into the foreseeable future, related to publishing their own work as well as obtaining access to the publications of others. The requirements are simply summarized. Scientists need: 1) a publication process that is as rapid as possible, while maintaining 2) high editorial quality and scientific rigor; 3) assurance of permanent availability of published work; 4) a wide audience for their work together with 5) broad availability of the works of others, including access to abstracts, indexes, and the use of robust searching tools. Among the major points discussed are the following: Electronic manuscript submission and distribution to reviewers can greatly facilitate the steps of the pre-publication process, simultaneously improving the speed of publication (no snail mail) and reducing costs (no postage). Hybrid journals (both print and on-line) can offer a blend of traits advantageous to scientists. The digital age will lead scientists, librarians and publishers to consider what form "permanence" will take. Scientists based at institutions will still depend upon institutional libraries for access to the breadth of scientific literature. How scientists, libraries and publishers will meet the dynamic issue of cost is complex and unresolved.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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