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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of Tillage and Rainfall on Recompaction and Soil Strength

Authors
item Busscher, Warren
item Bauer, Philip
item Frederick, James - CLEMSON UNIV,FLORENCE

Submitted to: Soil and Water Conservation Society Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2002
Publication Date: August 1, 2002
Citation: BUSSCHER, W.J., BAUER, P.J., FREDERICK, J.R. EFFECT OF TILLAGE AND RAINFALL ON RECOMPACTION AND SOIL STRENGTH. JOURNAL OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION. 2002. V. 57. P.317.

Technical Abstract: In many Coastal Plain soils, subsurface horizons recompact quickly and require annual or semi-annual (for double cropping) deep tillage to provide a suitable rooting environment. We measured soil strength in treatments that were deep tilled to examine recompaction. Soil strengths were measured from 9 days to 6 years after tillage, with rainfall amounts between tillage and soil strength measurement ranging from 0 to about 270 in. Measurements were made at the point of maximum disruption by a paratill which disturbed soil to 35-cm to 40-cm depths. Recompaction was still taking place at the 6 years after deep tillage. Recompaction was slower than expected probably because of controlled traffic or excessive disruption by the paratill. Recompaction, at least temporarily, was greater for the 4- to 8-in depths when compared to the 10- to 14-in depths. Though recompaction was slow, tillage would still be necessary annually or seasonally because even with incomplete recompaction, yield-reducing soil strengths built up after a year or less.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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