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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Vegetatively Propagated Collections in the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System.

Authors
item VOLK, GAYLE
item WALTERS, CHRISTINA

Submitted to: Cryobiology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 15, 2002
Publication Date: July 29, 2002
Citation: Volk, G.M., Walters, C. 2002. Vegetatively propagated collections in the U.S. national plant germplasm system. Cryobiology. 39th Meeting of the Society for Cryobiology, July 28-31, 2002, Breckenridge, Colorado. p.151.

Interpretive Summary: The United States National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) includes more than 450,000 accessions that are evaluated, regenerated and distributed from Plant Introduction Stations in Pullman, WA; Ames, IA; Geneva, NY; Griffin, GA and at Clonal Repositories in Brownwood, TX; Corvallis, OR; Davis, CA; Hilo, HA; Riverside, CA; Mayaguez, PR; Miami, FL. The National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation (NCGRP) in Ft. Collins, CO serves as a base collection for the entire NPGS and maintains more than 370,000 accessions at -18C or in liquid nitrogen vapor. The NPGS collection contains about 30,000 accessions of vegetatively-propagated germplasm. Cryopreservation protocols need to be developed before most of these accessions can be maintained in the base collection at the NCGRP. Currently, there are dormant buds stored in liquid nitrogen vapor for the Malus and Prunus cerasus collections as well as cryopreserved shoot tips for small percentages of the Pyrus, Rubus, Corylus, and Mentha collections. Slow growth axenic cultures of Pyrus, Rubus, Fragaria, Vaccinium, Mentha, and Corylus are also maintained at the NCGRP. Germplasm from more tropical origins has proven difficult to cryopreserve successfully. While methods are under development for the cryopreservation of additional vegetatively propagated germplasm collections, we propose that pollen and/or seeds, which are more amenable to cryopreservation, are stored for germplasm that is of wild origin. We provide data on collection size, number of "wild" accessions, and overall feasibility of seed and/or pollen storage for 65 of the NPGS clonal crops. Availability of this data allows us to determine research priorities within the NCGRP Research Unit.

Technical Abstract: The United States National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) includes more than 450,000 accessions that are evaluated, regenerated and distributed from Plant Introduction Stations in Pullman, WA; Ames, IA; Geneva, NY; Griffin, GA and at Clonal Repositories in Brownwood, TX; Corvallis, OR; Davis, CA; Hilo, HA; Riverside, CA; Mayaguez, PR; Miami, FL. The National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation (NCGRP) in Ft. Collins, CO serves as a base collection for the entire NPGS and maintains more than 370,000 accessions at -18C or in liquid nitrogen vapor. The NPGS collection contains about 30,000 accessions of vegetatively-propagated germplasm. Cryopreservation protocols need to be developed before most of these accessions can be maintained in the base collection at the NCGRP. Currently, there are dormant buds stored in liquid nitrogen vapor for the Malus and Prunus cerasus collections as well as cryopreserved shoot tips for small percentages of the Pyrus, Rubus, Corylus, and Mentha collections. Slow growth axenic cultures of Pyrus, Rubus, Fragaria, Vaccinium, Mentha, and Corylus are also maintained at the NCGRP. Germplasm from more tropical origins has proven difficult to cryopreserve successfully. While methods are under development for the cryopreservation of additional vegetatively propagated germplasm collections, we propose that pollen and/or seeds, which are more amenable to cryopreservation, are stored for germplasm that is of wild origin. We provide data on collection size, number of "wild" accessions, and overall feasibility of seed and/or pollen storage for 65 of the NPGS clonal crops. Availability of this data allows us to determine research priorities within the NCGRP Research Unit.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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