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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Biology and Systematics of Albusambia Elaphoglossumae, a New Genus and Species of Crambidae (Lepidoptera: Pyraloidea: Crambidae) Mining the Fronds of Elaphoglossum Conspersum (Pteridophyta: Lomariopsidaceae) in Costa Rica

Authors
item Solis, M
item Davis, Donald - SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
item Nishida, Kenji - UNIVERSIDAD OF COSTA RICA

Submitted to: Tropical Lepidoptera
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 4, 2002
Publication Date: December 30, 2005
Citation: Solis, M.A., Davis, D.R., Nishida, K. 2005. Biology and systematics of Albusambia elaphoglossumae, a new genus and species of crambidae (Epidoptera: Pyraloidea: Crambidae) mining the fronds of Elaphoglossum conspersum (Pteridophyta: Lomariopsidaceae) in Costa Rica. Tropical Lepidoptera. 53(3-4):487-501.

Interpretive Summary: Many caterpillars which feed on plants are pests, but when species are found that can feed on invasive weeds they can be very beneficial to the control of these weeds. Recent interest in biological control agents of invasive ferns has prompted the exploration for and discovery of new pyraloid moth caterpillars feeding on ferns. A genus and species new to science is described from Costa Rica. The caterpillar is a miner in the fronds of a fern. All stages of this species are described and illustrated, and its biology is discussed. This information will be useful to action agencies or quarantine identifiers, biological control workers, and other scientists.

Technical Abstract: Albusambia elaphoglossumae Solis & Davis, a new genus and species, are described from Costa Rica. The species was discovered mining in a fern, Elaphoglossum conspersum Christoph. The immatures and its biology are also described. The new species is compared to Undulambia polystichalis Capps that has been reared on leather-leaf fern and species of Neurophyseta Hampson. The taxonomic placement of Albusambia, the preponderance of other fern-feeders in Pyraloidea and Musotiminae, and their discovery during exploration for biological control agents of invasive ferns are discussed.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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