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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genetics and Immunoassay Research

Author
item Skoda, Steven

Submitted to: APHIS-ARS-Mexico US Commission for the Eradication of Screwworm Meeting
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: March 28, 2000
Publication Date: March 28, 2000

Interpretive Summary: The following interpretive summary refers to the (3rd of 6) invited oral presentations given by Dr. Skoda at the APHIS-ARS-Mexico US Commission for the Eradication of Screwworm Meeting, March 2000. The screwworm eradication program has been successful in part because of research that anticipates and answers questions and problems for the program. Scientists at the Midwest Livestock Insects Research Unit (MLIRU) have done research leading to the development of monoclonal antibodies specific to the screwworm and useful in developing a field identification kit. MLIRU scientists have devloped molecular genetic tools usefull in identifying screwworms from othe flies and potentially useful in determining the source of screwworm samples. Work at the MLIRU has shown that when adult, female screwworms are given protein in the form of dry blood added to the diet that egg production is increased; this could improve rearing efficiency. Screwworms collected from Jamaica were shown to be compatible with current strains used in mass productiion in mating studies done at the MLIRU. Insecticide bioassays showed that a program to develop an insecticide resistant strain of screwworms for use in developing a genetic sexing strain were of limited success, thus new avenues will be explored.

Technical Abstract: The following technical abstract refers to the (3rd of 6) invited oral presentations given by Dr. Skoda at the APHIS-ARS-Mexico US Commission for the Eradication of Screwworm Meeting, March 2000. The screwworm eradication program has been successful in part because of research that anticipates and answers questions and problems for the program. Scientists at the Midwest Livestock Insects Research Unit (MLIRU) have done research leading to the development of monoclonal antibodies specific to the screwworm and useful in developing a field identification kit. MLIRU scientists have developed molecular genetics tools useful in identifying screwworms from othe flies and potentially useful in determining the source of screwworm samples. Work at the MLIRU has shown that when adult, female screwworms are given protein in the form of dry blood added to the diet that egg production is increased; this could improve rearing efficiency. Screwworms collected from Jamaica were shown to be compatible with current strains used in mass production in mating studies done at the MLIRU. Insecticide bioassays showed that a program to develop an insecticide resistant strain of screwworms for use in developing a genetic sexing strain were of limited success, thus new avenues will be explored.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014