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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Resistance to Sclerotinia Wilt in Wild Sunflower Species

Authors
item Rashid, Khalid - AGRIC & AG-FOOD CANADA
item Seiler, Gerald

Submitted to: Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 16, 2002
Publication Date: July 1, 2002
Citation: RASHID, K.Y., SEILER, G.J. RESISTANCE TO SCLEROTINIA WILT IN WILD SUNFLOWER SPECIES. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PLANT PATHOLOGY. 2002. V. 24. P. 395.

Interpretive Summary: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) De Bary is a widespread plant pathogen affecting over 300 plant species. In sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), the mycelia infect under ground plant parts causing wilt, and ascospores infect stems and heads causing stem and head rot. This study investigated the resistance to this pathogen in 396 accessions of wild perennial sunflower species H. maximiliani Schrader and H. nuttallii T. & G. Artificial inoculation was applied to the soil at the seedling stage to study the resistance to wilt, and to the flowers to study the resistance to head rot. A total of 29 accessions of H. maximiliani and 66 accessions of H. nuttallii showed no signs of root/stem infections or wilt, indicating resistance to this fungus. The assessment of the reaction to head rot was not successful perhaps because of unfavorable conditions for infections. Further investigation is underway to study the genetics of resistance to sclerotinia wilt and head rot in resistant accessions, and to transfer the resistance genes to H. annuus.

Technical Abstract: Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) De Bary is a widespread plant pathogen affecting over 300 plant species. In sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), the mycelia infect under ground plant parts causing wilt, and ascospores infect stems and heads causing stem and head rot. This study investigated the resistance to this pathogen in 396 accessions of wild perennial sunflower species H. maximiliani Schrader and H. nuttallii T. & G. Artificial inoculation was applied to the soil at the seedling stage to study the resistance to wilt, and to the flowers to study the resistance to head rot. A total of 29 accessions of H. maximiliani and 66 accessions of H. nuttallii showed no signs of root/stem infections or wilt, indicating resistance to this fungus. The assessment of the reaction to head rot was not successful perhaps because of unfavorable conditions for infections. Further investigation is underway to study the genetics of resistance to sclerotinia wilt and head rot in resistant accessions, and to transfer the resistance genes to H. annuus.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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