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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Dryland agriculture in Mexico and the U.S. Southern Great Plains

Authors
item Baumhardt, Roland
item Salinas-Garcia, Jaime - INIFAP

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy Monograph Series
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: March 11, 2003
Publication Date: August 15, 2006
Citation: Baumhardt, R.L., Salinas-Garcia, J. 2006. Dryland agriculture in Mexico and the U.S. Southern Great Plains. In: Peterson, G.A., Unger, P.W., Payne, W.A., editors. Dryland Agriculture. American Society of Agronomy Monograph Series No. 23. Madison, WI: American Society of Agronomy. p. 341-364.

Interpretive Summary: We describe the US southern Great Plains and northern Mexico dryland production regions in a standard monograph format. This included the regional boundaries, climatic factors of precipitation, evaporation, temperature, and water deficit. Various soil management/erosion and cropping factors are discussed and contrasted over this extensive region. Regionally unique as well as universally applied tillage, and soil and crop management practices were described. The soil erosion management concerns were often universal for these regions, which we contrasted in terms of historical similarities between the 1930s US-Dustbowl era and present day agriculture in Mexico. Cropping factors discussed include crop selection, rotation sequences, tillage practices, fertility management, and regional weeds insects and disease issues. Emerging best crop management choices and cultural practices used throughout the southern Great Plains and northern Mexico dryland production regions are described. We highlighted the common practice of growing crop rotation sequences with intervening fallow (idle) periods to conserve precipitation as soil water. Socio-economic similarities and differences were briefly discussed and overall future research needs suggested.

Technical Abstract: Following the "Dryland" monograph editors standardized chapter format, we describe the US southern Great Plains and northern Mexico dryland production regional boundaries and various climatic factors including: precipitation, evaporation, temperature, and water deficit. Dryland soil management, erosion and cropping practices are described and contrasted within this extensive region. Regionally unique as well as universally applied soil tillage and crop management practices were described and application examples given. The soil management concerns about erosion were universal within these regions, which we contrasted in terms of historical similarities between the 1930s US-Dustbowl era and present day agriculture in Mexico. We also discussed regionally unique, but frequently common, crop management factors including crop selection, rotation sequences, tillage practices, fertility management, and regional weeds insects and disease issues. The emerging best crop choices and optimum cultural practices for use in dryland production on the southern Great Plains and Mexico regions were described. We highlighted the common practice of growing crop rotation sequences with intervening fallow (idle) periods to conserve precipitation as soil water. Socio-economic similarities and differences were briefly discussed and overall future research needs suggested.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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