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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of Three Early Maturing Anasazi Type Common Bean Germplasms with Resistance to Bean Common Mosaic Virus

Authors
item Brick, M - COLORADO STATE UNIV
item Ogg, J - COLORADO STATE UNIV
item Miklas, Phillip
item Schwartz, H - COLORADO STATE UNIV
item Judson, F - FRUITA RES STN, CO

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2001
Publication Date: February 1, 2002
Citation: BRICK, M.A., OGG, J.B., MIKLAS, P.N., SCHWARTZ, H.F., JUDSON, F. REGISTRATION OF THREE EARLY MATURING ANASAZI TYPE COMMON BEAN GERMPLASMS WITH RESISTANCE TO BEAN COMMON MOSAIC VIRUS. CROP SCIENCE, 42:672. 2002.

Interpretive Summary: The Native American Anasazi beans, indigenous to the southwestern United States, are sold in local markets and consumed by Native Americans of that region. Anasazi beans are also marketed as a novelty food across the United States. The original Anasazi landrace has poor disease resistance and poor adaptation to commercial bean production regions across the U.S. Breeders at Colorado State University, in cooperation with a research geneticist with USDA-ARS (Prosser, WA), have bred disease resistant Anasazi beans with higher yield potential and wider adaptation. These lines will facilitate production of Anasazi beans in different regions of the country, and improve yield and quality of the product that is grown.

Technical Abstract: CO-32948, CO-32977, and CO-40696 are three Anasazi-type common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm lines developed by the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station. Anasazi-type dry beans are grown commercially in the southwestern J.S. The predominant Anasazi-type cultivar grown in the Four-Corners region of southwestern Colorado was derived from a Native American landrace with late maturity, a vigorous, recumbent growth habit, and high susceptibility to bean common mosaic (BCM) caused by Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV). This cultivar is drought tolerant, photoperiod sensitive, and uniquely adapted to the arid high altitude regions of the American southwest. When grown in more northern latitudes, flowering and crop maturity are delayed and the crop is often damaged by frost.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014