Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Crapemyrtle, Lagerstroemia Spp.

Author
item Pooler, Margaret

Submitted to: Flower Breeding and Genetics: Issues, Challenges and Opportunities for the 21st Century (Kluwer)
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: September 29, 2005
Publication Date: May 27, 2006
Citation: Pooler, M.R. 2006. Crapmyrtle - Lagerstroemia indica. In N.O. Anderson (ed). Flower breeding and genetics. Issues, challenges, and opportunities for the 21st century. 2:428-449. Springer, New York.

Interpretive Summary: The crapemyrtle has become a mainstay in mild-climate landscapes because of its ease of production and cultivation, long-lasting mid summer bloom, range of plant habits from miniature potted plant to large tree, and diversity of landscape uses. Important traits for both production and landscape use include flower color and bloom time, plant habit and form, cold hardiness, and disease and pest resistance. Breeding efforts in crapemyrtle should focus on elucidating the inheritance of some of these traits, as well as broadening the genetic base of cultivated Lagerstroemia through interspecific hybridization or direct gene transfer.

Technical Abstract: The crapemyrtle has become a mainstay in mild-climate landscapes because of its ease of production and cultivation, long-lasting mid summer bloom, range of plant habits from miniature potted plant to large tree, and diversity of landscape uses. Important traits for both production and landscape use include flower color and bloom time, plant habit and form, cold hardiness, and disease and pest resistance. Breeding efforts in crapemyrtle should focus on elucidating the inheritance of some of these traits, as well as broadening the genetic base of cultivated Lagerstroemia through interspecific hybridization or direct gene transfer.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page