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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS BASED MANURE OR COMPOST APPLICATION

Authors
item Eghball, Bahman
item Gilley, John

Submitted to: Proceedings Great Plains Soil Fertility Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2000
Publication Date: December 20, 2000
Citation: EGHBALL, B., GILLEY, J.E. NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS BASED MANURE OR COMPOST APPLICATION. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR PLANNING ANIMAL WASTE OPERATIONS. PP. 127-135. 2000.

Interpretive Summary: Composted and non-composted beef cattle feedlot manure were applied based on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal of corn to determine the effects of these management strategies on crop and soil. In the runoff study, N and P-based beef cattle manure or compost were applied to no-till and disked systems. P-based manure or compost treatments received additional fertilizer N as needed, and fertilized and unfertilized checks were also included. Manure or compost application resulted in corn grain yields similar to those of the fertilizer treatment. P-based manure or compost application resulted in corn grain yields similar to those for N-based treatments but in significantly less soil P levels after four years of application. Estimated N availability was 40% for manure and 15% for compost in the first yr and was 18% for manure and 8% for compost in the second yr after application. Surface soil levels of total carbon, total N, nitrate, pH, and electrical conductivity were increased significantly following four year of manure or compost application. In the runoff study, concentrations of dissolved P (DP), bioavailable P, and ammonium-N in runoff were significantly greater when manure and compost were applied to the soil surface as compared to incorporation. In the disked system, N or P-based manure or compost application resulted in DP concentration < 1 mg L-1 (the critical concentration). Under no-till, runoff DP concentration was > 1 mg L-1 for the N-based application, but was < 1 mg L-1 for the P-based treatments. P-based manure and compost application seems to be agronomically and environmentally sound but can increase the hauling distance.

Technical Abstract: Composted and non-composted beef cattle feedlot manure were applied based on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal of corn to determine the effects of these management strategies on crop and soil. In the runoff study, N and P-based beef cattle manure or compost were applied to no-till and disked systems. P-based manure or compost treatments received additional fertilizer N as needed, and fertilized and unfertilized checks were also included. Annual or biennial manure or compost application resulted in corn grain yields similar to those of the fertilizer treatment. Phosphorus-based manure or compost application resulted in corn grain yields similar to those for N-based treatments but in significantly less soil P levels after 4 yr of application. Estimated N availability was 40% for manure and 15% for compost in the first yr and was 18% for manure and 8% for compost in the second yr after application. Surface soil levels of total C, total N, nitrate, pH, and EC were increased significantly following four year of manure or compost application. In the runoff study, concentrations of dissolved P (DP), bioavailable P, and NH4-N in runoff were significantly greater when manure and compost were applied to the soil surface as compared to incorporation. In the disked system, N or P-based manure or compost application resulted in DP concentration < 1 mg L-1 (the critical concentration). Under no-till, runoff DP concentration was > 1 mg L-1 for the N-based application, but was < 1 mg L-1 for the P-based treatments. P-based manure and compost application seems to be agronomically and environmentally sound but can increase the hauling distance.

Last Modified: 8/31/2014
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