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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Modulation of Health and Production by Oral Beta-Glucan and Ascorbic Acid after Transport

Authors
item Eicher, Susan
item Johnson, T - PURDUE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Journal of Dairy Science
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 24, 2001
Publication Date: July 24, 2001
Citation: EICHER, S.D., JOHNSON, T.R. MODULATION OF HEALTH AND PRODUCTION BY ORAL BETA-GLUCAN AND ASCORBIC ACID AFTER TRANSPORT. JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE. 2001. V.85(SUPPL.1): ABSTRACT P. 82.

Technical Abstract: Yeast cell-wall Beta-glucan works synergistically with ascorbic acid to enhance growth of neonatal calves in indoor, raised crates. Objectives of this study were to determine 1) if this combination of dietary supplements would improve neonatal calves' stress responses to transport, 2) production and health differences following transport and 3) response differences between calves fed the yeast cell-wall derivative and purified Beta glucan from yeast cell-walls. Calves (n=39) were assigned to treatments; (IG) 113 g of a yeast cell wall derivative (Energy-plus, Natural Chem. Industries, LTD) and 250 mg of an ascorbic acid product (Stay-C, Roche Vitamins), (BG) 150 mg of a Beta-glucan water-soluble fraction from yeast cell-walls that is equivalent to that contained in Energy-plus 250 mg Stay-C, or (Con) a positive control with no supplements, but 1 L subcutaneous electrolytes. Calves were fed milk replacer at 4.45 kg/d in 2 equal feedings with supplements in the milk replacer. A grain based dry feed was offered beginning on d 3. Calves, 3 to 10 d-of-age, were transported for 4 h, after being weighed and sampled by jugular venipuncture, then calves began treatments in outdoor hutches. Weights were taken weekly for 4 wk and feed weighed back every other day. Fecal and clinical scores, and nasal and ocular discharge occurrences were recorded 3 times per wk. Blood samples were collected 0 h then d 3, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28 post-transport. Although weights were not different among calves, intake at week 4 was less for IG than for Con (P<.05). Feed efficiency was improved for IG (P<.05) and were not improved for BG (P<.10) at wk 4. Plasma IgG, fecal and clinical scores, serotonin, and tryptophan were not different (P>.10). Ocular and nasal discharge scores were greater for BG than for IG during wk 2 (P < .05). This coincided with peripheral blood mononuclear cell counts that were least for BG compared to IG and Con on d 10 samples and IG greater than Con (d 3), and BG (d 21 and 28) (P< .05). Plasma fibrinogen tended (P<.10) to be greater for IG than Con (d 7) and than BG (d21). Both beta-glucan products were beneficial for feed efficiency by wk 4. However, it appears the mechanisms may be different because many of the health and immune measures were different between IG and BG at d 10 to 28.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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