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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Volunteer Potato (Solanum Tuberosum): a Significant Weed of Pacific Northwest Irrigated Crop Production

Authors
item Boydston, Rick
item Williams, Martin - WSU, PROSSER, WA

Submitted to: Weed Science Society of America Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2001
Publication Date: February 1, 2002
Citation: BOYDSTON, R.A., WILLIAMS, M.M. VOLUNTEER POTATO (SOLANUM TUBEROSUM): A SIGNIFICANT WEED OF PACIFIC NORTHWEST IRRIGATED CROP PRODUCTION. WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA ABSTRACTS, VOL. 42:47, #166. 2002.

Technical Abstract: Potato is a leading crop in the Columbia Basin of Washington and Oregon which support the highest recorded yields in the world. Post-harvest field surveys indicate dropped/unharvested tuber density ranges from 1.5X to 10X the normal planting density. Overwinter tuber survivorship is high in the region due to a mild winter climate. Although crop rotation can minimize many serious diseases and insects affecting potatoes, presence of volunteer potatoes negate the benefits of the cultural practice and are difficult to control in a rotational crop. Previous research has identified critical cold exposure requirements needed to kill tubers. Although several authors have evaluated individual tactics (e.g. herbicide use) for manipulating volunteer potato fitness, results underscore the need for imposing multiple stresses to achieve acceptable suppression of the weed. Emerging research includes building upon the current knowledge of pest biology as well as integrating crop competition, tillage, herbicides, and biological control.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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