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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Campylobacter: Stress Responses in Foood Environments and Detection.

Authors
item Fratamico, Pina
item Bhaduri, Saumya
item Solow, B - DYNPORT VACCINE CO.
item Cloak, O - MOLECULAR CIRCUITRY, INC.

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: May 10, 2002
Publication Date: September 23, 2002
Citation: FRATAMICO, P.M., BHADURI, S., SOLOW, B., CLOAK, O. CAMPYLOBACTER: STRESS RESPONSES IN FOOOD ENVIRONMENTS AND DETECTION. MEETING ABSTRACT. 2002.

Technical Abstract: Campylobacter continues to be the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. Foods of animal origin are significantly associated with Campylobacter infection, therefore, rapid and sensitive methods for detection of the pathogen in foods and in animals are needed. A multiplex PCR assay targeting genes specific for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli was developed to detect and distinguish C. jejuni and C. coli, the species most commonly associated with human illness. There is relatively little information on the ability of Campylobacter spp. to recognize and adapt to different environmental conditions such as oxidative, heat, and cold stress. Thus, the effect of cold stress on C. jejuni and C. coli on chicken and pork skin was examined. Over 48 h, viable counts declined 2 to 3 log10 CFU/cm2 at -20ºC, <1 log10 CFU/cm2 at 4ºC, and 1 to 2 log10 CFU/cm2 at 25°C regardless of skin type, species of Campylobacter, or level of oxygen. Survival of Campylobacter on chicken skin and ground chicken decreased during storage at -20ºC, and the decline in cell numbers was higher on chicken skin compared to ground chicken. Other research examined the conditions under which autoinducer-2, a molecule involved in quorum sensing, is produced by Campylobacter. C. jejuni and C. coli possess luxS, which is responsible for autoinducer-2 (AI-2) production. Using a Vibrio harveyi luminescence assay, the production of AI-2 was observed in milk, chicken broth, and brucella broth under different conditions. Related studies showed that D-values of Campylobacter were increased when in the presence of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens compared to the absence of these organisms. The research enhances our understanding of factors affecting growth and survival of Campylobacter exposed to stress and our ability to detect the pathogen in foods.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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