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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Dietary Fat Related Attitudes and Behaviors of Adult Males of Different Ethnicity/race.

Author
item Bowman, Shanthy

Submitted to: American Dietetic Association Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 23, 2002
Publication Date: July 27, 2002
Citation: BOWMAN, S.A. DIETARY FAT RELATED ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIORS OF ADULT MALES OF DIFFERENT ETHNICITY/RACE. AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING. 2002.

Technical Abstract: The objective of the study was to examine dietary-fat related attitudes and practices of adult males, ages 20 years and over, in the USDA's, nationally representative, 1994-1996 Diet and Health Knowledge Survey (DHKS). There were 2,304 non-Hispanic, White Americans, 275 African Americans, and 241 Hispanics in the study. Survey weights were used in the data analysis to represent the population studied. A higher proportion of African American (57%) and Hispanic (64%) males than White males (49%) said that it was very important to them to have a diet low in fat. A high percent of Hispanic males met the Dietary Guidelines recommendations for total fat (36%) and saturated fat (44%), while a low percent of African American males met total fat (28%) and saturated fat (32%) recommendations. The dietary practices varied among the three groups: African Americans were more likely to eat chicken as fried chicken, eat potato or corn chips 4 to 5 times a week, always add fat to cooked vegetables (28%), always eat large portions of meat (27%), and less likely to remove skin off chicken, choose lean meats, or drink skim milk; Hispanic males were more likely not to drink skim milk or choose low-fat luncheon meats, but less likely to add fat on cooked vegetables including baked or boiled potatoes; and White males were more likely to always use fat on baked potatoes (61%) and eat large portions of meat, but were more likely to always drink skim milk, choose lean meat, and remove skin off chicken. This study showed differences in fat-related, dietary practices among ethnic groups and races.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014