Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Development of Multi-Component Transplant Mixes for Plant Growth-Promotion and Disease Suppression

Author
item Burelle, Nancy

Submitted to: International Congress of Nematology
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2002
Publication Date: January 21, 2004
Citation: Burelle, N.K. 2004. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-COMPONENT TRANSPLANT MIXES FOR PLANT GROWTH-PROMOTION AND DISEASE SUPPRESSION. International Congress of Nematology. 2:187-194.

Interpretive Summary: This abstract is for an invited symposium presentation at the Fourth International Congress of Nematology, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain, June 8-13, 2002. The symposium in which this presentation will be made will focus on the successful development of biological control agents. The described research was undertaken to develop a biologically-based product that, when added to vegetable transplant mixes, would enhance plant growth, increase yield, and provide protection against pathogens. Studies were initiated at Auburn University in cooperation with Gustafson LLC where organic components and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were tested for effects on tomato growth and nematode galling. Gustafson LLC and USDA, ARS then entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for field-testing in Florida, where combinations of amended transplants and methyl bromide alternative soil treatments were evaluated. Significant increases in growth, vigor, and transplant survival occurred with PGPR formulations on a variety of crops including tomato, pepper, strawberry, muskmelon, and watermelon. Some PGPR formulations reduced galling by root-knot nematode, enhanced resistance to important foliar pathogens, and increased yield. This cooperative research resulted in a commercial product, BioYieldTM, for use on transplanted crops.

Technical Abstract: Research was undertaken to develop a biologically-based product that, when added to transplant mixes, would enhance plant growth, increase yield, and provide protection against pathogens. Studies at Auburn University in cooperation with Gustafson LLC tested organic components and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) for effects on tomato growth and nematode viability. Organic components and PGPR were combined and evaluated. Gustafson LLC and USDA, ARS then entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) for field-testing in Florida, where combinations of amended transplants and methyl bromide alternative soil treatments were evaluated. Significant increases in tomato and pepper growth, vigor, and transplant survival occurred with formulations of PGPR. One formulation reduced root-knot nematode galling and several improved pepper root condition. Four PGPR treatments reduced angular leaf spot lesions caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans, and gummy stem blight, caused by Didymella bryoniae, on watermelon. One PGPR treatment reduced root-knot nematode disease severity on muskmelon. The effects of bare root, plug, and PGPR amended plug transplants on growth and yield of strawberry showed that PGPR amended plugs had highest yields, and bare root transplants had lowest yields. This cooperative research resulted in a commercial product, BioYieldTM, for use on transplanted crops.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page